Drivers under 25 are more likely to send text messages and make calls behind the wheel. They're also less able to handle distractions while driving. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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CamelBak-brand water bottles on display at an outdoor supply store in Arcadia, Calif., in 2008. The company removed BPA from the plastic in its bottles. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Legal Battle Erupts Over Whose Plastic Consumers Should Trust

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When it comes to learning how to drive, your teen is probably as harried as you are. Research shows that scare tactics meant to instill caution, though, are less effective than kind words. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Cheer Up: It's Just Your Child Behind The Wheel

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Tomatoes getting a splash of water reinforces the notion that McDonald's food is wholesome in China, as seen in this video screengrab. McDonald's China hide caption

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McDonald's Food Has A Healthy Glow, At Least In China

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Opana is the latest painkiller that's become popular with drug abusers. Thomas Walker/Flickr hide caption

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As Pain Pills Change, Abusers Move To New Drugs

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Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has higher rates of readmissions for Medicare patients for some conditions. But its mortality rates for the same conditions is lower than at many hospitals. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center hide caption

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Child life specialist Kelly Schraf helps to put at ease Yoselyn Gaitan, 8, who had surgery on her cleft palate, at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Jenny Gold for NPR hide caption

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Hospital Specialists Help Remind The Sickest Kids They're Still Kids

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Shannon Orley, left, meets with her health coach, Kelly Heithold, right, at Providence Alaska Medical Center. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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An Alaska Company Losing The Obesity Game Calls In Health Coaches

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Stop At The Drugstore Now Includes HIV Test

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An analyst works in the Olympic anti-doping laboratory in January. The lab in Harlow, England will test 5,000 of the 10,490 athletes' samples from the London 2012 Games. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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