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An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office released Tuesday found that ending cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers, a move that President Trump is contemplating, would raise the deficit by $194 billion over 10 years. Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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CBO Predicts Rise In Deficit If Trump Cuts Payments To Insurance Companies

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Michelle Labra and her daughter, Daphne, live in an accessory dwelling unit (ADU) in their landlord's backyard. Portland has among the most permissive rules for ADUs in the country. Last year, the city issued building permits for about one a day. Amelia Templeton/OPB hide caption

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'Granny Pods' Help Keep Portland Affordable

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President Trump at a listening session with health insurance executives at the White House earlier this year. Aude Guerrucci/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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A 2008 photo shows Presidio Terrace, a gated community in San Francisco. A San Jose couple bought the street — a private road — after the homeowners association failed to pay a tax bill. Dale/Flickr hide caption

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Why America's Wages Are Barely Rising

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A Wells Fargo Bank branch office in San Francisco. The bank acknowledges it signed up nearly 500,000 auto-loan customers for insurance they didn't need. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Who Snatched My Car? Wells Fargo Did

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Dow Tops 22,000, Helped By Apple Shares

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Traders and financial professionals work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday. Major stock indexes are in record territory. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Why The Stock Market's Rise Isn't Just A Trump Rally

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In 2015, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (center) signs into law an ordinance raising the city's minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020. Though California isn't one of them, 27 states have passed laws requiring cities to abide by state minimums. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Cities Raise Minimum Wages, Many States Are Rolling Them Back

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Michael McBrayer tests his blood sugar before eating lunch. He gets supplies he needs to manage diabetes for free as part of a deal between his employer and health insurer. Evan Frost/MPR News hide caption

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Health Insurers Try Paying More Up Front To Pay Less Later

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Association-based health insurance could have a lot of appeal for restaurants and other businesses with younger, healthier workers. Tetra Images/Getty Images/ hide caption

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Half of all the debt that appears on credit reports is related to medical expenses, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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New Rule Clears The Way For More Class-Action Lawsuits Against Banks

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The GOP health bills would eliminate the 10 percent tax on the use of tanning beds. It was one of more than a dozen taxes introduced as part of the Affordable Care Act. Robert Gauthier/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Gauthier/LA Times via Getty Images