We've searched shelves, shops and sites across the universe to bring you some really great comics. Shannon Wright for NPR hide caption

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Shannon Wright for NPR

Thoreau was born 200 years ago, on July 12, 1817. He died of tuberculosis at age 44. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

If Thoreau Were Alive, He'd Be 'Shouting From The Rafters,' Biographer Says

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"I lost the first good novel I ever wrote to a computer disaster. It happened at a crucial time in my life, when I was still figuring out if I could even do this thing — become a writer." Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images

A Novelist Forces Himself To Press On After Losing 100 Pages In A Tech Glitch

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Eloise's dog, Weenie, wasn't always a pug, as evidenced by this 1954 Hilary Knight drawing. Collection of Hilary Knight/Copyright Kay Thompson/ New York Historical Society hide caption

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Collection of Hilary Knight/Copyright Kay Thompson/ New York Historical Society

'Eloise At The Museum' Tells The Story Behind The Beloved Mischief-Maker

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Octavia Butler at home. A lifelong bibliophile, she considered libraries sacred spaces. (c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens hide caption

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(c) Patti Perret/The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Octavia Butler: Writing Herself Into The Story

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Author Elin Hilderbrand fell in love with summer as a kid, at the cottage her family rented on Cape Cod. Nina Subin hide caption

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Nina Subin

Writer Elin Hilderbrand, 'Queen Of Summer,' Wears Her Crown Proudly

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After Anatevka: A Novel Inspired by "Fiddler on the Roof", by Alexandra Silber. Pegasus Books hide caption

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Pegasus Books

How 'Fiddler On The Roof' (And Writing Its Sequel) Helped An Actress Find Closure

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap

Comedian Mike Myers grew up an avid Toronto Maple Leafs fan, mostly playing street hockey on tennis courts in the suburb of Scarborough. The reason for his first visit to Chicago, where he would later perform with The Second City comedy troupe? To take in a Chicago Blackhawks game before the team's stadium was torn down. Courtesy of Mike Myers and Doubleday Canada hide caption

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Courtesy of Mike Myers and Doubleday Canada

'Feel The Civility': Comedian Mike Myers On Canada — And 'Canada'

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incomible/Getty Images/iStockphoto

'I Want The Pages To Turn': Librarian Nancy Pearl's Summer Reading List

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Michael Bond sits with a Paddington Bear toy in 2008. Bond died Tuesday, according to his publisher, nearly six decades after his beloved character first appeared in print. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

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Sang Tan/AP

Dr. Vanessa Grubbs and Robert Phillips at their wedding in August 2005. Just a few months earlier, when his kidneys were failing, she gave him one of hers. Courtesy of Vanessa Grubbs hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanessa Grubbs

'Interlaced Fingers' Traces Roots Of Racial Disparity In Kidney Transplants

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A replica of Anne Frank's diary is displayed at the Indianapolis Children's Museum in Indianapolis. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

75 Years Later, Anne Frank's Diary Still Has Much To Teach

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Elvis Presley, in the studio in 1956 — Presley's success was undoubtedly driven by the material he appropriated from black musicians. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Roxane Gay is a novelist and short story writer. Her previous books include Bad Feminist, Difficult Women and An Untamed State. She teaches English at Purdue University. Jay Grabiec/HarperCollins hide caption

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Jay Grabiec/HarperCollins

Be Bigger, Fight Harder: Roxane Gay On A Lifetime Of 'Hunger'

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

In 'Memory's Last Breath' An Academic Confronts Dementia

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Linda Fortune's family was forced out of District Six when she was 22. Growing up, the family often ate crayfish her father caught as a hobby. "If you had an overabundance of fish, you would share it with the neighbors," she recalls. Alan Greenblatt/NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt/NPR

The new poet laureate of the United States, Tracy K. Smith, visits the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center in Washington, D.C., last month. Shawn Miller/Library of Congress hide caption

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Shawn Miller/Library of Congress

Tracy K. Smith Reads 'When Your Small Form Tumbled Into Me'

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What Makes A Good Whodunit? 'Magpie Murders' Author Spells It Out

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