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Exclusive First Read: 'The Dinner' By Herman Koch

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American poet Robert Frost, shown here in 1955, died on Jan. 29, 1963. Now, 50 years after his death, a rare collection of letters, audio and photographs sheds new light on his religious beliefs. AP hide caption

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Rare Robert Frost Collection Surfaces 50 Years After His Death

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Data gleaned from e-readers gives writers a new kind of feedback to take into consideration — or ignore. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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E-Readers Track How We Read, But Is The Data Useful To Authors?

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Beams of sunlight stream through the windows of Grand Central Terminal, circa 1930. Hal Morey/Getty Images hide caption

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A Historic Arrival: New York's Grand Central Turns 100

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George Saunders On Absurdism And Ventriloquism In 'Tenth Of December'

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New education standards place more emphasis on nonfiction reading and writing over fiction works. Some say this could lead students away from a passionate engagement with literature. Chris Sadowski /iStockphoto hide caption

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New Reading Standards Aim To Prep Kids For College — But At What Cost?

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Emily Musette Hays performs in the 2012 Poetry Out Loud finals in Washington, D.C. The U.S. competition served as a model for the U.K.'s Poetry By Heart contest. James Kegley/The Poetry Foundation hide caption

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U.K. Asks Students To Learn Poetry 'By Heart,' Not By Rote

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Whole Foods has more than 300 stores and continues to expand. Harry Cabluck/AP hide caption

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Whole Foods Founder John Mackey On Fascism And 'Conscious Capitalism'

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In Texas, Bexar County officials compare the proposed digital-only library to an Apple store. The 4,989-square-foot modern space will contain 100 e-readers available for circulation, 50 e-readers for children, 50 computer stations, 25 laptops and 25 tablets on-site. Courtesy of Bexar County hide caption

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Hold On To Your Tighty Whities, Captain Underpants Is Back!

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Scottish actor Sean Connery is seen in 1982 during the making of the film Never Say Never Again. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor applauds during a reception in her honor at the White House. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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