The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Brick and mortar bookstores hang on, realism in children's stories, and a poet on disability, eugenics and faith. Plus, Pop Culture Happy Hour on Stephen King, and L'Oreal's dark roots.

The cover to Journals by Kurt Cobain. Courtesy of Riverhead Books hide caption

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Courtesy of Riverhead Books

Kurt Cobain's Journals: The Writer Behind The Rock Star

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Look twice: Champion skier and skateboarder Kevin Michael Connolly goes places most people wouldn't. And most people -- unlike Connolly -- have legs. Courtesy of Kevin Michael Connolly hide caption

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Courtesy of Kevin Michael Connolly

'Double Take' Author: Skiing Hard And Staring Back

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India's Diverse Faiths, As Told Through 'Nine Lives'

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Quanah Parker was the last chief of the Comanches — and the son of Cynthia Ann Parker, who was captured as a child by the Comanches. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Comanche Nation: The Rise And Fall Of An 'Empire'

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What Are The Odds? A Book About Bookies

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Explorer Bart Hogan stands at an entrance to the Cheve cave in Mexico. Author James M. Tabor writes about a 2004 expedition through the Cheve supercave in his new book Blind Descent. Frank Abbato hide caption

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Frank Abbato

A 'Blind Descent' Into The Deepest Caves On Earth

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Chris Silas Neal

To Market, To Market: 10 Top Summer Cookbooks

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William-Henry Ireland forged hundreds of documents and passed them off as William Shakespeare originals. After his confession, he went on to publish a series of Gothic novels and some romantic poetry. Courtesy of Doug Stewart hide caption

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Courtesy of Doug Stewart

William-Henry Ireland's Great Shakespearean Hoax

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Chris Silas Neal

Summer Books That Make The Critics' Cut

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