The Week's Best Stories From NPR Books This week: Hillary Clinton explains What Happened, reporter Katy Tur gives her "front-row" view of the Trump campaign, and new fiction from Attica Locke, Celeste Ng and Nicole Krauss.

Attica Locke is the author of Black Water Rising, The Cutting Season and Pleasantville, and has written for the Fox drama, Empire. Ulf Andersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulf Andersen/Getty Images

Author Attica Locke: In America, We Walk 'Side By Side' With Our Past

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Katy Tur is now an anchor for MSNBC and a reporter for NBC News. Elena Seibert/Harper Collins hide caption

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Elena Seibert/Harper Collins

Reporter Katy Tur Shares Her 'Front-Row' View Of The Trump Campaign

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Christina Ascani/NPR

A Mother And Daughter Upset Suburban Status Quo In 'Little Fires Everywhere'

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Christina Ascani/NPR

Leaving The Past Behind — Or Trying To — In Rushdie's Latest

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One of Twitty's projects is his "Southern Discomfort Tour" — a journey through the "forgotten little Africa" of the Old South. He picks cotton, chops wood, works in rice fields and cooks for audiences in plantation kitchens while dressed in slave clothing to recreate what his ancestors had to endure. Courtesy of Michael Twitty hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Twitty

John le Carré, whose real name is David Cornwell, once worked as a British intelligence officer. His 1974 novel, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, also centers on George Smiley. Kirsty Wigglesworth/dapd/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/dapd/AP

In 'A Legacy Of Spies,' John Le Carré Goes Back Out In 'The Cold'

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Nathan Englander is also the author of What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank. Joshua Meier/Courtesy of Alfred A. Knopf hide caption

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Joshua Meier/Courtesy of Alfred A. Knopf

Nathan Englander Says His New Book Is 'A Turducken Of A Novel'

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Jesmyn Ward poses for a portrait near DeLisle Bayou in DeLisle, Miss. Ward, 40, has chosen to return to DeLisle and raise her children there, despite her profound ambivalence about what the town represents. Emily Kask for NPR hide caption

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Emily Kask for NPR

Writing Mississippi: Jesmyn Ward Salvages Stories Of The Silenced

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Lani Sarem poses with her novel Handbook for Mortals at the release party for the book in Chicago earlier this month. Barry Brecheisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Barry Brecheisen/Getty Images

The Brief, Tumultuous Reign Of An Erstwhile Best-Seller

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A U.S. Marine from the 1st Battalion, 8th Marines, Alpha Company looks out as an evening storm gathers above an outpost near Kunjak, in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters/Viking hide caption

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A Retired Marine And A Photojournalist Confront War's 'Invisible Injuries'

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