US Airways planes prepare to taxi for takeoff at Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix in 2007. US Airways is one of many airlines that have farmed out some maintenance to repair shops in developing countries. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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To Cut Costs, Airlines Send Repairs Abroad

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Crossed Wires: Flaws In Airline Repairs Abroad

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Aviation maintenance technicians Gina Teague (left) and Prasad Itty (right) work on the interior of an MD-80 jet at American Airlines' Tulsa overhaul base. Courtesy of Mike McNally/American Airlines - Tulsa hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Mike McNally/American Airlines - Tulsa

Bucking Trend, Airline Keeps Repairs In-House

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