The Deadliest Roads Are Rural
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120716625/120925949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Justin Peacock (left) helps fellow Gators fan Mike Starling drink the "World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail" during tailgating activities at a recent University of Florida game. The parties outside stadiums are under fire amid growing concerns about underage drinking, drunken driving and other risky behaviors. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Greg Allen/NPR
Reining In Tailgate Parties A Challenge For Colleges
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120551372/120909101" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A driver uses a cell phone in Freeport, Maine, in September. Maine and more than a dozen other states have implemented laws to curb distracted driving practices such as texting or talking on cell phones while operating a car. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

toggle caption Robert F. Bukaty/AP
Waging War On Distracted Driving
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120778418/120896415" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Courtesy of Advanced Transport Systems Ltd.
Personal Rapid Transit: Future Or Elevated Fantasy?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120590726/120872870" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Automakers Help Aging Drivers Travel More Safely
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120766921/120872872" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
How To Make Trucks Safer On Highways
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120833750/120833743" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Basil Rynestead, 17, sits in the driver's seat of his Toyota pickup truck. New federal government numbers confirm that male drivers are still having twice as many fatal crashes as females. And the boys are more likely than the girls to have been speeding or drinking. Sarah Nathan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Sarah Nathan/NPR
Teenage Boys More Likely To Be In Fatal Car Crashes
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120537839/120846583" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Why You're Not The Great Driver You Think You Are
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120541921/120809097" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Safe Driving For Seniors: Officials Get Creative
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120537339/120784374" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
What Would You Give Up For Safer Roads?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/120769728/120769717" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript