Two women check their cellphones as they hawk their wares on a bridge over the Artibonite River, whose waters are believed to be the source of Haiti's 2010 cholera outbreak. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Then-candidate Michel Martelly casts his ballot at a polling station during a presidential runoff in Port-au-Prince, on March 20. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Electoral workers count ballots by candlelight at a polling station at the end of a presidential runoff in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Sunday. The two choices were Mirlande Manigat, the former first lady, and Michel "Sweet Micky" Martelly, a Haitian music star. Results are expected at the end of March. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Fires burn on the streets of Petionville, outside the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince, on Tuesday. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Despite the rubble and lack of permanent housing in post-quake Haiti, one positive sign is the vast number of children who have been able to return to school. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR

A guard stands outside a prototype "transitional" housing model at the resettlement camp in Corail-Cesselesse, outside Port-au-Prince. World Vision along with several other aid agencies has developed these small dwellings, intended to house families of up to five people. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Roughly 1,000 people are living on an 8-foot-wide stretch of median in the middle of Route Nationale 2, a torn-up, six-lane road that is one of Haiti's busiest. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The U.S. Agency for International Development has contracted with relief groups to hire Haitians to clear rubble in the coastal city of Leogane. They also hope to get locals involved in the rebuilding process. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

At his school in Port-au-Prince, Lochard Samael, 6, works on a math problem with his teacher. He lost his father in the Jan. 12 earthquake but has since been able to return to school. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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