Former U.S. Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton walk with Haitian President Rene Preval (center), near the destroyed presidential palace on March 22. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Audio from Martin Kaste

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United Nations troops from Bolivia distribute water and meals to the residents of Cite Soleil, Haiti, after the Jan. 12 earthquake. Marco Dormino/Courtesy of U.N. hide caption

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Foreign Aid A Blessing, Curse For Struggling Haiti

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Workers remove rubble from a destroyed school in Port-Au-Prince in early March. Haitians now must find a way to dispose of the estimated 25 million cubic yards of debris left in the wake of the powerful earthquake that struck the country in January. Thony Belizaire/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haiti Seeks A Home For An Endless Sea Of Debris

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In this image provided by the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon greets Sean Penn as he visits a tent camp at the Petionville Club golf course in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on March 14. Sophia Paris/MINUSTAH via Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Penn's Latest Role: Haiti Relief Worker

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Berlyne Chery, 13, after being returned to her village of Calebasse, Haiti. She was one of the 33 children taken by a group of U.S. missionaries after the earthquake in January. The missionaries claimed the children were orphans, but they all have living parents. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Haiti Quake 'Orphans' Reunited With Parents

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A tent camp at the Petionville Club in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, holds about 40,000 people, according to local organizers. Officials say 250,000 people across the city need to be moved out of camps such as this one before the rainy season arrives in the next few weeks. This camp is at the bottom of a ravine and could flood during a heavy rain. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Rains, Flooding Threaten Haiti's Most Vulnerable

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Letters To Haiti Provide A Different Kind Of Help

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Women at work last month at the DKDR garment assembly factory in Port-au-Prince. The international community and business leaders see January's earthquake as an opportunity to tackle corruption and inefficiencies in the economy. Javier Galeano/AP hide caption

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After Quake, Haiti Seeks Better Business Climate

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A group of teenage boys who lost their families and homes in Haiti's Jan. 12 earthquake have formed a brotherhood of sorts, and are helping one another survive. They live in a Port-au-Prince park with no shelter and no adult supervision. The boys have washed and worn the same clothes they were wearing the day of the quake. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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In Haiti, Quake's Orphans Long For A Home

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Children play inside the Ecle College Mixtede La Foi, a school that has been converted into a shelter for earthquake refugees in Montrouis, Haiti, about 50 miles northwest of Port-au-Prince. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Quake-Ravaged Haiti Struggles To Revive Schools

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15 minutes outside of Port-au-Prince, along the shoulder of National Road 2, a sign from the Department of Tourism instructs people not to throw garbage. But this site has now become a makeshift dump, where rubble from the Jan. 12 earthquake is piled as far as the eye can see. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Planning For Haiti's Future Presents Many Challenges

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A soldier with the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division carries supplies as he hurries to get on a Navy helicopter in Port-au-Prince on Jan. 18. hide caption

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U.S. Military Role In Haiti Met With Mixed Emotions

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Quake Survivors Struggle To Stay Dry In Haiti

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Women wait in a food distribution line in Port-au-Prince. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Aid Groups Fret As Haiti Giving Slows Down

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Since the January earthquake, Luxon Fanfan now operates his barbershop in Port-au-Prince, from a street corner. Here, customer Cadelis Dennis gets a haircut. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Port-Au-Prince Journal: Lives Filled With Fear

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