Electoral workers count ballots by candlelight at a polling station at the end of a presidential runoff in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Sunday. The two choices were Mirlande Manigat, the former first lady, and Michel "Sweet Micky" Martelly, a Haitian music star. Results are expected at the end of March. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ramon Espinosa/AP

Fires burn on the streets of Petionville, outside the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince, on Tuesday. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Despite the rubble and lack of permanent housing in post-quake Haiti, one positive sign is the vast number of children who have been able to return to school. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR

A guard stands outside a prototype "transitional" housing model at the resettlement camp in Corail-Cesselesse, outside Port-au-Prince. World Vision along with several other aid agencies has developed these small dwellings, intended to house families of up to five people. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Roughly 1,000 people are living on an 8-foot-wide stretch of median in the middle of Route Nationale 2, a torn-up, six-lane road that is one of Haiti's busiest. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

The U.S. Agency for International Development has contracted with relief groups to hire Haitians to clear rubble in the coastal city of Leogane. They also hope to get locals involved in the rebuilding process. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

At his school in Port-au-Prince, Lochard Samael, 6, works on a math problem with his teacher. He lost his father in the Jan. 12 earthquake but has since been able to return to school. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Navy Lt. j.g. Jamie McFarland laughs with volunteer Allen Wilner Herard at Haiti's only golf course, which was turned into a camp for Haitians displaced by the Jan. 12 earthquake. McFarland and her team set up trenches and canals to direct storm runoff out of the camp. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Members of the Red Cross carry orphans from Haiti arriving in France for adoption by French families. All had been adopted prior to the massive earthquake that killed an estimated 200,000 people on Jan. 12. Boris Horvat/Pool/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Boris Horvat/Pool/AP

Children relocated from the Petionville Club camp in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, walk through their new home at a government resettlement camp in Corail-Cesselesse. Petionville residents are being moved to the new camp because of the risk of flooding and landslides at the current location during the coming rainy season. Lee Celano/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Lee Celano/Getty Images