Antarctica's March of the Tourists()  

Photo Gallery: Destination Antarctica

March 25, 2008 An unprecedented 40,000 people will visit Antarctica this year. For many, reaching the icy continent represents a great personal achievement — but waves of tourists could potentially do more damage there than climate change.

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In Iceland, Unintended Witnesses to Climate Change()  

An ATV driver attaches a chain to an expedition truck stuck in a river.

December 4, 2007 For more than 30 years, a group of doctors and their friends and family have made a long, bone-jarring and wet trip to a glacier in the center of Iceland. The tradition is part camping adventure, part scientific expedition, and increasingly bittersweet.

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Greenland's Mysterious Holes Speed Ice Flow to Sea()  

Photo Gallery: Greenland: Ice on the Move

December 24, 2007 Many lakes formed by melting ice drain through passages called moulins, which carry water to the bedrock below the ice sheet that covers 80 percent of Greenland. The water under the ice sheet lubricates it, making it flow faster toward the sea.

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Lessons from America's Tropical Epidemic()  

author Molly Caldwell Crosby

February 26, 2008 In 1878, an outbreak of yellow fever crippled Memphis, Tenn., fueled by unusually warm temperatures. America's yellow fever epidemic has again become relevant, as a case study of how warm temperatures shift disease trends.

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Penguins Helped and Hurt by Changing Climate()  

Nesting Adelie penguin colony at Cape Royds

March 31, 2008 Exactly 100 years ago, scientists started studying a penguin colony at Cape Royds, Antarctica. What they've learned since then suggests that climate change will reshuffle life on the planet in complicated ways.

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Cruising to Otherworldly Antarctica()  

Iceberg

March 24, 2008 Onboard a modern ocean liner, travel to the frozen continent is a far cry from the life-risking affair that it was for early explorers. But Antarctica's allure is still just as powerful.

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Antarctica's Sea 'Babies' in Limbo()  

Researcher Donal Manahan

March 17, 2008 The icy ocean around Antarctica is one of the most unspoiled in the world. It's world-renowned for its penguins, but one team of scientists is more concerned about the animals you can't see — and the fate these microscopic creatures may face in a warming world.

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A Bright Spot of Life on the Icy Continent()  

Audio Slideshow: Way Down South

March 15, 2008 The vast, icy expanse of the South Pole has nurtured its own community. But what kind of people come for months at a time to live at the most difficult place on Earth?

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Global Warming Hits Tropical Glaciers in the Andes()  

March 10, 2008 "Tropical glaciers" may sound like an oxymoron, but these unique ice floes are dotted throughout Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. Scientists say global warming is quickly destroying these glaciers, including Zongo, near La Paz, Bolivia.

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Outlook Bleak for Joshua Trees()  

Joshua Tree

February 4, 2008 During the Ice Age, Joshua trees thrived across the American Southwest with the help of the ground sloth. The animals have been extinct for 13,000 years, and scientists predict that without the sloth's help, global warming will cause the desert tree to disappear, too.

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A scientist at a glacier in Greenland.