Trees Lost to Katrina May Present Climate Challenge()  

Jeff Chambers

January 21, 2008 Hurricane Katrina destroyed hundreds of millions of trees. As those trees decay, they're emitting tons of carbon dioxide, new research shows. And that makes them part of the climate-change problem that makes intense storms like Katrina more frequent.

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With Climate Change Comes Floods()  

Bangladeshi women make their way through flood water at Dhakuria in Sirajgonj district.

January 14, 2008 A warming atmosphere also means a warming ocean. As water heats up, it expands and triggers a sea level rise around the world. By 2080, a U.N. panel predicts this will have devastating consequences for millions of people around the world rich and poor alike.

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In Texas, Climate Creeping onto Agenda()  

Audio Slideshow: Texas Windfarmer

November 26, 2007 Texas is the nation's largest energy hog because it has a lot of industry, a lot of people, a lot of air conditioning, a lot of miles and a lot of big cars. But in a state where many think bigger is better, there are a few signs that attitudes toward consumption are changing.

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Web Site Tracks Carbon Emission Sources()  

A map shows the highest C02-emitting power plants in the world.

November 14, 2007 Power plants are the biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, accounting for 40 percent of the CO2 pumped into the atmosphere. A new Web site shows how much carbon is coming from each plant or power company around the world.

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Soybean Trade Drives Forest Destruction in Brazil()  

November 12, 2007 In Brazil, a fast-growing soybean industry is fueled by demand from Europe and China. But foreign consumers are also pressuring Brazilian farmers to stop clearing tropical forests, a major storehouse of the carbon that contributes to global warming.

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Amazon Fire Wars Exacerbate Global Warming()  

John Carter, an American rancher living in Brazil, rounds up a calf.

November 5, 2007 In Brazil, people use fire as a weapon in range wars to push other ranchers off their land. Scientists say these fires, along with the seasonal fires to clear land, is not just destroying parts of the Amazon's southern forests, but altering the climate as well.

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How a Volcano Eruption Wiped Away Summer()  

Volcanologist Haraldur Sigurdsson

October 22, 2007 Two centuries ago, an enormous volcanic explosion on an Indonesian island spewed molten rock and clouds of gas into the atmosphere, causing a "year without summer" as far away as America. Within the next millennium, the Earth is due for another such blast.

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Public Works Endanger Japan's Environment()  

October 9, 2007 Shinto is a distinctly Japanese religion and it attributes souls to animals, vegetables and even rocks. But for decades, construction driven by public works projects has turned Japan into the ugliest country in the world, according to one expert.

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America's Car Culture Clashes with Climate Change()  

September 3, 2007 For the last century, Americans have had a love affair with their cars. Americans drive bigger cars than any other country. And, even if they're currently trendy, fuel-efficient cars still don't sell as well in the United States as elsewhere. Can America change?

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Is the Planet's Carbon Sink Getting Too Full?()  

A view of the Earth from space.

August 2, 2007 The ocean's job is to keep the planet cool by absorbing carbon dixoide from the atmosphere. These days, it's working overtime

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