To Slow Amazon Fires, Scientists Light Their Own()  

Amazon Burns Photo Gallery

November 6, 2007 A few months ago, a team of scientists walked into a stretch of Amazon forest and purposely burned it. The researchers want to understand how burning forests contribute to climate change — and they want to know how to slow or stop the fires.

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With Climate Swing, a Culture Bloomed in Americas()  

Archaeologist Jonathan Haas

February 11, 2008 Along the coast of Peru, a mysterious civilization sprang up about 5,000 years ago. A team of archaeologists believe a climate change led to the rise of this civilization of mound builders, which eventually spread across South America.

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Watching Peru's Oceans for Cholera Cues()  

Researcher holding jars of water

February 25, 2008 Warming oceans were behind Peru's cholera outbreaks in the 1990s, and global warming may cause future outbreaks. Some scientists in Peru are closely watching microscopic marine life, hoping to catch an outbreak before it begins.

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Floating Architecture for a Changing Climate()  

April 21, 2008 Architect Koen Olthuis believes the best way to live with water is to live on water. In a Climate Connections video, Olthius explains why he wants to lead Holland — and the world — toward an amphibious future.

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The Pioneer Who Died for the South Pole()  

Robert Scott Discovers the Tent

March 30, 2008 A century ago, British Naval Officer Robert Falcon Scott sought to lead the first team to the South Pole. He lost the race by five weeks, but collected scientific data on the Antarctic climate that scientists still use today.

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Rainfall Shortages Threaten Costa Rica Power()  

Technicians at the Angostura plant monitor water levels and electrical output.

February 11, 2008 Costa Rica's efforts to minimize global warming have made it especially vulnerable to climate changes. Because it relies on hydroelectric power, even a tiny shift in rainfall patterns could leave the country without enough water to meet its growing demand for electricity.

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Farming the Amazon with a Machete and Mulch()  

Rosario Costa-Cabral. Credit: Ketzel Levine, NPR.

February 4, 2008 On jungle land at the mouth of the Amazon River, one resourceful female farmer has become a master of adaptation in a landscape of constant change. Her story offers an example of how individuals might face the challenges of climate change.

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Dutch Architects Plan for a Floating Future()  

The Maasbommel floating amphibious  houses.

January 28, 2008 Architects in Holland are showing the rest of the world a way of turning adversity into opportunity. Instead of building around rising waters, they ask, why not build on water? Floating houses, gardens, even villages are the future vision of some Dutch planners.

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Crucial California Delta Faces a Salty Future()  

Marci Coglianese, former mayor of Rio Vista

January 14, 2008 Rising sea levels from global warming threaten to turn California's Sacramento Delta into a salty marsh. But the delta provides drinking water for millions, and locals fear competing interest groups are blocking solutions.

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Venice Offers Lessons on Coping with Rising Seas()  

January 7, 2008 As the Earth warms up, rising sea levels will increase the threat of storm surges and flooding. In some places, that will make exisiting problems worse. Venice, Italy, offers a glimpse at what may lie ahead. A major engineering project aims to protect it from the rising sea, but most Venetians seem to take high water in stride.

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Emilio Lobo, a Cape Verde farmer.
Jon Hamilton, NPR