Dr. Alex Dromerick co-directs the Brain Research Center at the National Rehabilitation Hospital. Here he observes Stephen Jones, a policeman who was involved in a motorcycle accident. Becky Lettenberger/NPR hide caption

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Military's Brain-Testing Program A Debacle
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Sgt. Nathan Scheller was twice denied for a Purple Heart, though roadside bomb explosions left him with lasting cognitive damage. Above, Scheller walks with his wife, Miriam, and his family. NPR/Frontline hide caption

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Army Clarifies Purple Heart Rules For Soldiers
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Brendan Jannesen, 23, plays Wii ping pong as part of his balance therapy with physical therapist Brian Smith. Project Share provides a combination of physical, speech and occupational therapy, coping skills and psychological counseling to brain-injured troops. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Philanthropist Provides Care That The Pentagon Won't
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Sarah Wade, 36, and her husband, Ted Wade, 33, of Chapel Hill, N.C., often travel to Washington, D.C. for his medical care after he was injured while riding in a Humvee in Mahmudiyah, Iraq, on Feb. 14, 2004, and suffered a traumatic brain injury, as well as an above-the-elbow amputation of his right arm. Sarah has also been actively lobbying to get the right kind of care for her husband. Coburn Dukehart/NPR hide caption

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Pentagon Plan Won't Cover Brain-Damage Therapy
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Retired Army Major Michelle Dyarman holds the Purple Heart medal she was awarded after suffering a severe concussion from an IED in Baghdad in 2005. Robb Hill for NPR hide caption

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Once Denied A Purple Heart, A Soldier Gets Her Medal
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Sgt. Victor Medina suffered brain damage in 2009 when a roadside bomb exploded in Iraq. Blake Gordon/Aurora Photos hide caption

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Top Army Brass Still Don't Think Brain Injuries Count
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Sgt. Derrick Junge was diagnosed with a concussion, but passed over for a Purple Heart. Junge has not received rehabilitation or treatment for ongoing medical difficulties, and he struggles with simple tasks. NPR/Frontline hide caption

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Purple Hearts Elusive For Traumatic Brain Injuries
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