Monet in Normandy: The Making of Impressionism In France, the region of Normandy was the scene of bravery and slaughter in World War II -- and the cradle for some of the most beautiful art works ever made. Just East of the D-Day beaches, in big and small towns near the English channel, French artists launched the 19th century revolution that became Impressionism. NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg has a series of artistic vignettes.

Claude Monet bought his house in Giverny seven years after he first started renting it. He worked hard to create the gardens, later featured in his paintings, around his home. Fondation Claude Monet hide caption

toggle caption
Fondation Claude Monet

Monet The Gardener: Life, And Art, Grow At Giverny

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128245987/128313905" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Claude Monet

Monet's Canvas Cathedrals: A Life Study Of Light

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128221023/128260118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Boudin painted his Personnages sur la plage de Trouville in 1865, about 10 years after befriending Monet. Henri Brauner/Musee Eugène Boudin, Honfleur hide caption

toggle caption
Henri Brauner/Musee Eugène Boudin, Honfleur

Eugene Boudin: The Man Who Inspired Monet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128174560/128235113" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript