Young women from all over Afghanistan's Badakhshan Province study midwifery for eighteen months in the capital city of Faizabad. The next class of students will graduate in the coming weeks -- then return to their villages. Jim Wildman/NPR hide caption

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In Afghanistan, Midwives 'Are Like Guardian Angels For Infants And Mothers'

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Taliban Terrorize Streets Of Kandahar

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Haji Gul Nazim shows how he was able to wash off voter registration ink from his finger. To vote in Afghanistan, each voter presents and identification card and dips his finger in a bottle of indelible ink. If the ink washes off, voters might then be able to vote again -- using bogus identification cards. Jim Wildman/NPR hide caption

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Afghan Election Not A Sign Of The Government's Sustainability

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Afghan Election Tests Legitimate Voting

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Petraeus: U.S. To Pursue 'More Nuanced' Operations In Kandahar

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Former head of Afghan intelligence Amrullah Saleh was fired earlier this year because of his opposition to the Karzai administration's efforts to negotiate with the Taliban. He says a Taliban-friendly government would mean Afghan rights are "violated fundamentally." Jim Wildman/NPR hide caption

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Former Afghan Intelligence Service Chief: The Taliban 'Are Our Killers'

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Gov. Atta Mohammad Noor, in his office in Afghanistan's  Balkh province. He once led Northern Alliance fighters against the Taliban. Today, he's a successful politician. Despite his past, he's willing to support negotiations with the Taliban. Jim Wildman/NPR hide caption

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Afghan Residents In The North Keep Taliban At Bay

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