Ayub Mohamed is a nominee for the Global Teacher Prize, worth $1 million, given out by the Varkey Foundation. YouTube hide caption

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Lesson Plan: Teach Students How To Rebuff Terrorist Recruiters
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Nigerian billionaire Tony Elumelu hopes to create job opportunities by investing in African startups. Above: Elumelu, center right, speaks at an entrepreneurship event in July 2015. Courtesy of Tony Elumelu Foundation hide caption

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To End Poverty, Billionaire Gives $10,000 To 10,000 Entrepreneurs
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The University of Toronto's solar-powered pond aerator could help fish farmers in Bangladesh earn up to $250 of extra income a year. Courtesy of Powering Agriculture and University of Toronto hide caption

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Babajide Bello of the tech company Andela takes a selfie with AOL's Steve Case after the pair played a pickup game of pingpong. Courtesy of Andela hide caption

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Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless
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Noemi Sosa shops at Daily Table, a nonprofit supermarket in Dorchester, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Trader Joe's Ex-President Opens Store With Aging Food And Cheap Meals
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A new smartphone app gives a close-up view of a patient's eye. Screengrab from video by Peek Vision, produced in collaboration with Sony Mobile. hide caption

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More than 1 million people in Peru earn less than the equivalent of about $450 each year. Courtesy of Michael Rizzo/CGAP hide caption

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What It Takes To Lift Families Out Of Poverty
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Kathmandu Living Labs' earthquake site collects data about conditions and needs. Each blue dot represents the number of reports of help wanted — medical, food, water or shelter — near Kathmandu. Kathmandu Living Labs hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR
Drop-In Chefs Help Seniors Stay In Their Own Homes
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One of the first homes going up on land bought and sold as part of a Canadian-Palestinian investment firm's effort to properly register plots. Much land in the West Bank is not registered and has no title deed, creating problems for economic development. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Clearing The Tangled Path For Land Ownership In The West Bank
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Safeena Husain says: "I educate girls." Her efforts have brought 80,000 Indian girls into school; last week she received a Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship (above). Courtesy of Skoll Foundation/Gabriel Diamond hide caption

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A woman cultivates seaweed off the coast of Madagascar to counter overfishing. She's working with Blue Ventures, a business that supports its conservation projects by giving ecotours. Courtesy of Skoll Foundation hide caption

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The Mariposa border crossing, as seen from Nogales, Ariz., September 2013. This land port serves as the main point of entry into the U.S. for fresh produce from Mexico. A lot of that produce gets rejected just past the border, even though it's perfectly tasty and edible. David Kadlubowski/Corbis hide caption

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Lunch, Not Landfill: Nonprofit Rescues Produce Rejected At U.S. Border
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Monique Yusizanna Ouz, 66, is going to have electricity for the first time in her life. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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She's 66 And Finally Getting Electricity. Bring On The Ice Cream!
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Blaze Bioscience is commercially developing the "paint," which glows when exposed to near-infrared light. Courtesy of Blaze Bioscience hide caption

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Doctors Test Tumor Paint In People
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After a long day at the Somali American Community Center he founded in Clarkston, Ga., and then at an after-school program, Omar Shekhey drives a taxi to earn extra money. Often he gives his earnings to refugees to help them with expenses. Kevin Liles for NPR hide caption

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Engineer Turned Cabbie Helps New Refugees Find Their Way
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