Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems The past decade or so has seen explosive growth in the number of social entrepreneurs — innovators who take a business-like approach to solving social problems. NPR profiles some of these entrepreneurs.

Gabriel Zepeda (right) makes an all-terrain wheelchair. He's been making wheelchairs for low-income Mexicans for 27 years. Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

Mexico And U.S. Team Up To Create Low-Cost Wheelchairs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533118638/536125143" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Advanced Placement Exam Scores In Alabama On The Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532350829/532350830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gordon (left) teaches Telly how to control his jealousy with breathing exercises. Courtesy of Sesame Workshop hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Sesame Workshop

When Elmo And Big Bird Talk To Refugees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/526775562/527092534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After a couple of stints behind bars, Angel LaCourt (right) is now a trainer at InnerCity Weightlifting in Boston. Here he works with Bill Gramby, who recently had a stroke and is working out to build strength and stamina. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

A Weightlifting Program Gives Ex-Cons A Chance At Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523436033/524936099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Virginia Tech Shooting Survivor On The 10th Anniversary

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/524076546/524076547" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. C. David Molina reviewing medical records in the 1980s. He was a doctor first, then a health insurer. Courtesy of Molina Healthcare hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Molina Healthcare

This CEO's Small Insurance Firm Mostly Turned A Profit Under Obamacare. Here's How

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516495579/517779839" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A student stands in one of the tiny houses created for flood victims in West Virginia. The homes, built by high school students, are fewer than 500 square feet. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

High School Students Build Tiny Houses For Flood Victims

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/509709398/513680007" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Refugees Claire Mukundente and Edward Murinzi share the lessons they've learned since coming to the U.S. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

Living In America 101: When Refugees Arrive, What Do They Need To Learn?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484050992/507670129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The sun illuminates a row of homes at Park Plaza Cooperative in Fridley, Minn. Five years ago, the residents formed a nonprofit co-op and bought their entire neighborhood from the company that owned it. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bridget Bennett for NPR

When Residents Take Ownership, A Mobile Home Community Thrives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/503052538/507142862" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dawn Tachell looks at the trash and debris that have collected in her community. Conditions in the neighborhood have become so bad that some people have abandoned their houses and moved out. Jed Conklin for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jed Conklin for NPR

Mobile Home Park Owners Can Spoil An Affordable American Dream

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502590161/507021488" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patient and counselor: In a village near Bhopal, India, a woman with depression (left) meets with her counselor. The counselor, who lives nearby and speaks the same dialect, has received three weeks of intensive training. The patient says the counselor changed her life for the better. Joanne Silberner for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Joanne Silberner for NPR

Neighbors Treating Neighbors For Depression And Alcoholism

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/505733704/505811951" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Patrick Meier (center, in cap) flies a drone in Nepal after the earthquake in 2015. Meier and his team were able to to capture detailed images of damage around the capital, Kathmandu. He believes using this technology will make crisis mapping even more effective for disaster response. Courtesy of Patrick Meier/WeRobotics hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Patrick Meier/WeRobotics

When Disaster Strikes, He Creates A 'Crisis Map' That Helps Save Lives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495795717/495965272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">