Pictured here on April 13, 2011, Barataria Bay — part of Louisiana's Barataria Basin — was one of the hardest hit areas in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion. Today, obvious signs of the spill have faded, but communities are still reeling from its effects. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Two Years Later, BP Spill Reminders Litter Gulf Coast

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Members of the Vietnamese community listen in Kenner, La., as independent claims administrator Ken Feinberg and Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu conduct a town hall meeting for residents economically affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Southeast Asian Immigrants Flounder After Gulf Spill

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Aaron Hofer, 27, of Bayou La Batre, Ala., has been largely out of work since the BP oil spill. The Iraq veteran and fourth-generation shrimper says if it wasn't for his children, he probably would have already committed suicide. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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BP Spill Psychological Scars Similar To Exxon Valdez

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Homemaker Lena Hofer, 25, recently went to the community center in Bayou La Batre, Ala., for free food and household goods -- and was reluctantly turned away by volunteers when Feed the Children ran out of supplies. "It's really hard when they send you away after you [ask for food], especially when you need it like I do," she says. "I'm about to cry." Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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BP Oil Well Capped, But Trauma Still Flowing

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Bayou Bienvenue in New Orleans is an example of south Louisiana’s wetland loss. Fifty years ago, this was a productive freshwater marsh with cypress and tupelo trees. Today, stumps are all that remain, as saltwater has encroached inland. Debbie Elliot/NPR hide caption

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La. Looks To New Plan To Restore Fragile Coast

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A Love-Hate History: Oil And Fishing In The Gulf

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David Chauvin Jr. lowers the oil boom while testing out the rigging. Matt Stamey/The Houma Courier hide caption

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Shrinking Coast, Expanding Oil: Shrimpers Clean Spill

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