Larry Smart, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, uses a fogger to spray pesticide to kill mosquitoes in an effort to stop a possible Zika outbreak in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Miami Steps Up Mosquito Control Efforts After Suspected Zika Cases

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Kathy Snook, Terri Anderson and Gary Snook traveled from Montana to Dr. Forest Tennant's office in West Covina, Calif. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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An anti-abortion demonstrator outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in March. Last month the high court struck down a Texas law that imposed tight regulations on abortion providers. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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'Unbroken Brain' Explains Why 'Tough' Treatment Doesn't Help Drug Addicts

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A Nuremberg magnifier and wooden case, made in Germany around 1700. Before spectacles become easier to wear and more comfortable, hand-held models were more common than those for the face. Courtesy of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Museum of Vision hide caption

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In states that made medical marijuana legal, prescriptions for a range of drugs covered by Medicare dropped. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Community members enjoy a picnic on Gould Farm in Monterey, Mass., in the 1920s. Work on the farm remains a key part of the therapeutic process. Courtesy of Gould Farm hide caption

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When mental health professionals don't take insurance, only the wealthy can afford their help. Joe Houghton/Getty Images hide caption

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How Therapy Became A Hobby Of The Wealthy, Out Of Reach For Those In Need

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Glenn Baker, 44, stands in his South Side apartment that is paid for by a program of the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago. Miles Bryan/WBEZ hide caption

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A Hospital Offers Frequent ER Patients An Out — Free Housing

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Ten-year-old Matthew Husby gets some low-tech comfort from his father after surgery at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford in Palo Alto, Calif. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Doctors Get Creative To Soothe Tech-Savvy Kids Before Surgery

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Abortion rights activists celebrate outside the U.S. Supreme Court Monday for a ruling in a case over a Texas law that places restrictions on abortion clinics. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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Younger siblings seem to have an immune advantage as early as 1 month of age, which may help explain where they get the energy to tease older siblings. Rebecca Schortinghuis/Getty Images hide caption

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