Shoppers check out vodka in a street kiosk in Moscow in 2008. Alexander Nemenov/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov/Getty Images

People practice yoga at a fundraiser for a breast cancer foundation in Hong Kong. Ed Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/Getty Images

Graduate student Jennifer Klunk of McMaster University examines a tooth used to decode the genome of the ancient plague. Courtesy of McMaster University hide caption

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Courtesy of McMaster University

Ancient Plague's DNA Revived From A 1,500-Year-Old Tooth

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Erick Munoz, flanked by lawyers, walks to 96th District Court last Friday. A judge ordered a Texas hospital to remove life support from his wife, Marlise. Tim Sharp/AP hide caption

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Tim Sharp/AP

A vendor sells chickens at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong last month. As a precautionary measure against the deadly H7N9 virus, Hong Kong has temporarily stopped importing poultry from mainland farms. Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images hide caption

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Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images

Clinical specialist Catey Funaiock took notes while observing a 5-year-old boy at the Marcus Autism Center, part of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, in September. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Insurers get paid more for older people under the Affordable Care Act, even if they're healthy. Tony Ding/AP hide caption

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Tony Ding/AP

The Healthy, Not The Young, May Determine Health Law's Fate

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The sexually transmitted cancer is common in street dogs around the world. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Researchers say that setting your thermostat a little lower can help you burn more calories. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Kendall Schrantz, center, stretches after a class at Downsize Fitness in Fort Worth. Lauren Silverman for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Silverman for NPR

In These Gyms, Nobody Cares How You Look In Yoga Pants

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Marilyn Budzynski takes care of her 20-year-old son, Michael, in Eustis, Fla., in September. Michael suffers from Dravet syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy. Tom Benitez/MCT /Landov hide caption

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Tom Benitez/MCT /Landov

Florida Bill Would Allow Medical Marijuana For Child Seizures

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SoloHealth owns 3,500 health screening kiosks like this one in San Francisco. In some states, the company sells customer contact information to insurers. April Dembosky hide caption

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April Dembosky

After Checking Blood Pressure, Kiosks Give Sales Leads To Insurers

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