Could a countdown to death help you lead a more ecstatic life? Daniel Horowitz for NPR hide caption

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Nothing Focuses The Mind Like The Ultimate Deadline: Death

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People drew maps of body locations where they feel basic emotions (top row) and more complex ones (bottom row). Hot colors show regions that people say are stimulated during the emotion. Cool colors indicate deactivated areas. Image courtesy of Lauri Nummenmaa, Enrico Glerean, Riitta Hari, and Jari Hietanen. hide caption

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The Number 6 Says It All About The HealthCare.gov Rollout

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A technique called optogenetics is being used in the laboratory to observe and control what brain circuits are doing in real time. Henning Dalhoff/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RM hide caption

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Experimental Tool Uses Light To Tweak The Living Brain

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Knee pain is common, but surgery isn't necessarily the answer, researchers say. Inna Jacquemin/iStockphoto hide caption

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Martine Rothblatt, CEO of United Therapeutics, is the namesake of the company's latest drug, Orenitram. Ron Levine/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Ernest Bagner III stands outside his former office tucked in the back corner of a strip mall in Hollywood, Calif., where he says he was the victim of Medicare fraud. Jonathan Alcorn/ProPublica hide caption

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How Fraud Flourishes Unchecked In Medicare's Drug Plan

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When Benta Odeny was diagnosed with HIV, she started to protect her husband Daniel from the virus by taking antiretroviral medications. The same drugs also helped her give birth to an HIV-negative daughter, Angelia. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

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HIV Treatment Keeps A Family Together And Growing In Kenya

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Not covered by Obamacare, but still sweet. Cristian Baitg/iStockphoto hide caption

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Before you have get a new hip, you might want to check the government's list of best and worst hospitals for the operation. iStockphoto hide caption

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A simulated patient at the University of Malaya makes use of different materials to mimic the look and feel of human tissue. /Courtesy of Vicknes Waran hide caption

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Rheanna Kathleen Morris hugs her mom, Peggy Sinclair-Morris. Jenny Gold for NPR hide caption

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Promises To Fix Mental Health System Still Unfulfilled

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