The CRISPR enzyme (green and red) binds to a stretch of double-stranded DNA (purple and red), preparing to snip out the faulty part. Illustration courtesy of Jennifer Doudna/UC Berkeley hide caption

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A CRISPR Way To Fix Faulty Genes
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Jason DaSilva was on a family vacation in 2006 when he fell and couldn't get up. His multiple sclerosis symptoms have progressed to the point that he can't walk. Factory Release hide caption

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Dorothea Handron suffered an infection after a surgeon unknowingly pierced her bowel during a hernia operation. She became so ill that doctors placed her in a medically induced coma for six weeks. Jim R. Bounds/AP Images for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Hospitals To Pay Big Fines For Infections, Avoidable Injuries
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Generic hydrocodone plus acetaminophen pills seen in a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt., in 2013. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Americans Weigh Addiction Risk When Taking Painkillers
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Antidepressant use nationally fell by 31 percent among adolescents between 2000 and 2010. Suicide attempts increased by almost 22 percent. JustinLing/Flickr hide caption

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Warnings Against Antidepressants For Teens May Have Backfired
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The company Proteus has developed a computer that attaches to a pill and tracks the pill's absorption into the body. The technology has passed clinical trials. iStock hide caption

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Someday Soon You May Swallow A Computer With Your Pill
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