After the earthquake, workers were sent inside Reactor 1 at the Fukushima plant to release some of the pressure building up inside the reactors. Frontline hide caption

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Frontline

One Year Later, 'Inside Japan's Nuclear Meltdown'

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Workers in protective suits and masks wait to enter the emergency operation center at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station on Nov. 12, 2011. David Guttenfelder /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David Guttenfelder /AFP/Getty Images

A 9.0-magnitude earthquake struck Japan offshore on March 11, setting into motion a tsunami that engulfed large parts of northeastern Japan and triggered a nuclear meltdown at a power plant in Fukushima. On March 26, a man walks among debris in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture, Japan. Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images hide caption

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Areas Of Northern Japan May Be Off-Limits For Years

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Workers decontaminate the roof of a kindergarten about 12 miles from the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan last month. Several hundred Japanese seniors have volunteered to take part in the cleanup effort. Hiro Komae/AP hide caption

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Hiro Komae/AP

Japanese Seniors: Send Us To Damaged Nuclear Plant

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Farmers whose crops were ruined by a nuclear accident protest Aug. 3 at the Tokyo Electric Power Co. Many Japanese are calling for the country to lessen its dependence on nuclear power following the accident six months ago. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images

After Nuclear Mishap, Japan Debates Energy Future

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Finance Minister Yoshihiko Noda was chosen leader of the ruling Democratic Party of Japan on Monday. That all but ensures his selection as Japan's next prime minister. Hiro Komae/AP hide caption

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Hiro Komae/AP

In Japan, Next Prime Minister Faces Many Skeptics

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Most of Kesennuma's large fishing boats either survived the tsunami or have been repaired. But many do not move from the dock, because most of the city's fish-processing factories still lie in ruins. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

After Quake, Japanese Fishing Port Remains At Risk

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Boston-based NGO All Hands is restoring water-damaged photos recovered from Japan's tsunami using scanners and a host of professional photo re-touchers around the world. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

In Japan, Restoring Photos For Tsunami Victims

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Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan speaks during a news conference in Tokyo in May. The beleaguered leader is expected to step down in coming weeks. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

In Japan, Holding Onto Political Reins Proves Elusive

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The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission says American nuclear plants need to be better prepared for the sudden and continued loss of electric power. Above, the Limerick Generating Station, a nuclear power plant in Pottstown, Pa. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Commission: U.S. Must Make Nuclear Plants Safer

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In Tokyo today, newspapers printed extra editions to report about the women soccer team's victory in the World Cup. Yoshikazu Tsuno /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno /AFP/Getty Images

This March 24 aerial photo shows the extent of damage at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The 40-foot-tall tsunami destroyed the electrical and cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns at some of the reactors. Air Photo Service/AP hide caption

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Air Photo Service/AP

Reports: Why Things Fell Apart At Fukushima Plant

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Nisaka Mieko gathers chives, which have been contaminated by radiation from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident. She says she may lose $25,000 in crops, and hopes to plant some of the seeds next year. Louisa Lim/NPR hide caption

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Louisa Lim/NPR

Despite Radiation, Some Japanese Villagers Stay Put

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The Japan Animal Rescue shelter in Samukawa houses about 200 dogs and cats, most of them brought in from the now off-limits area around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Risky Rescue: Saving Pets From Japan Exclusion Zone

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