The facilities at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant were designed to withstand strong earthquakes and tsunamis, but not to the strength and size experienced on March 11. Air Photo Service/AP hide caption

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Firefighters use heavy equipment to tear apart a collapsed 300-year-old house while searching for the dead in the rubble of Rikuzentakata, Japan. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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On Japan's Coast, A Search For Relatives And Relief
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Public Anger Against Nuclear Power Mounts In Japan
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The facilities at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant were designed to withstand strong earthquakes and tsunamis, but not to the strength and size experienced on March 11. Air Photo Service/AP hide caption

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Japanese Self-Defense Force soldiers walked in a line after finding the body of a boy in the rubble in Higashimatsushima, Miyagi prefecture earlier today (March 31, 2011). Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Jon Hamilton
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Japan's Nuclear Crisis Takes Its Toll On Utility
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One of the soggy wallets that have been brought into the Kamaishi police department following the tsunami. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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In Japan, Scenes Of Much Destruction, Little Looting
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Tokyo Electric Power Co. Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata (second from right) and other executives bow prior to a press conference at the company's headquarters in Tokyo on Wednesday. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Quake-Struck Japan, Businesses Try To Rebuild
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Can Japan Overcome Economic Hurdles?
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With its massive electronic billboards now dark, Tokyo's Shibuya fashion district is far more subdued than it was before the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tokyo Sees Its Lights Go Dim, And Lifestyles Change
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Children watch as their father is screened for radiation at a shelter in Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Plutonium is seeping from a damaged nuclear power plant into the soil outside, officials said Tuesday. Wally Santana/AP hide caption

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