In Kesennuma, garbage covers much of the city, particularly in the harbor. Some baseball fields and parks nearby have been converted into areas where cranes can sort through the debris. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

One Big Obstacle To Japan's Recovery? Trash

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Michihiro Kono is the ninth-generation chief executive of soy sauce maker Yagisawa Co. in Rikuzentakata, Japan. His factory, storeroom, customer records and two of his employees were washed away in the tsunami. But he's determined to rebuild. Chie Kobayashi for NPR hide caption

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Chie Kobayashi for NPR

Rebuilding A Soy Sauce Company, From The Barrel Up

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A security guard stands near the Toyota exhibit at the 2011 New York International Auto Show on Thursday. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Japanese Auto Executives Try To Put On Happy Face

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Newly minted second-graders in Rikuzentakata, Japan, begin their school year more than two weeks late after a tsunami wiped out most of the town. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Japan Struggles With How To Heal 'Children's Hearts'

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Japanese performers dance at a temple in the tsunami-devastated area of Rikuzentakata, Japan, on April 17. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japanese Celebrate The Dead Amid A Town's Ruins

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Reporter Recalls Covering Japanese Quake, Tsunami

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Katsunobu Yatagawa surveys the spinach crop he had to destroy because of radiation concerns. Farmers like Yatagawa in the Ibaraki prefecture are facing a ban on the sale of some of their products, and an uncertain future. Chie Kobayashi for NPR hide caption

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Japanese Farmers Linger In State Of Uncertainty

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Damage at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant, from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Tokyo Electric Power Co. hide caption

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Tokyo Electric Power Co.

Volunteers push a trolley filled with blankets destined for displaced people in the city of Kamaishi in Iwate prefecture. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japanese Youth Step Up In Earthquake Aftermath

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Japan Raises Severity Level At Nuclear Plant

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Workers at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant spray a substance to help reduce dust on April 1. The cleanup operation at the facility could take more than a decade. TEPCO hide caption

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TEPCO

Cleaning Up Fukushima: A Challenge To The Core

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A screen grab taken from news footage by Japanese public broadcaster NHK shows an aerial view of damaged train carriages in Shinchi, Fukushima prefecture, on March 12. NHK/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japan's Public Broadcaster Responds, Reports Crisis

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People try to browse at a supermarket with no electricity in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture, Japan. Businesses are especially worried about weathering Japan's sweltering summers without air conditioning. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

Major Power Shortages Loom Over Japanese Firms

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In Japan, Many Still Living On The Edge

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