This abandoned village outside the city of Zintan was populated by pro-Gadhafi families from the Mushashya, a nomadic tribe from southern Libya. Fighters from Zintan, which rebelled against Gadhafi forces, are hoping they won't come back. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Sean Carberry/NPR

Libyan Transitional National Council fighters said Moammar Gadhafi was captured Thursday in this graffitti-filled culvert in Sirte.

Philippe Desmazes /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Philippe Desmazes /AFP/Getty Images

Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, shown in a 2008 file photo, ruled Libya for 42 years. Libya's new leaders say he was killed Thursday in his hometown of Sirte.

Sergei Grits/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Sergei Grits/AP

Libyans visit the destroyed Bab al-Azizia military barracks and compound of their country's ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi, in the southern suburbs of Tripoli, Libya.

Bela Szandelszky/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Bela Szandelszky/AP

A revolutionary fighter watches over two suspected Gadhafi loyalists in Sirte, Libya, last month. By some estimates, up to 30 to 40 percent of Libyans are sympathetic to former dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Manu Brabo/AP

In Tripoli, Libya, women celebrate the revolution against Moammar Gadhafi's regime and call for a strengthening of women's rights, Sept. 2. After playing large but largely unsung roles during the uprising, women are now seeking a greater political role.

Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Abdel Hakim Belhaj (center left), a prominent militia commander, walks with Transitional National Council Chairman Mustafa Abdel Jalil in Tripoli on Sept. 10. The battle to oust Moammar Gadhafi produced a number of leaders who will have to work together to form a new government. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Francois Mori/AP

Libyans flee on foot along the main road heading west, away from Sirte, on Tuesday. Sirte, cut off from the rest of the country, is the last major town controlled by forces loyal to toppled dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Gaia Anderson/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Gaia Anderson/AP

Libyan rebels pray before going out on patrol outside the port city of Misrata on April 30. Religion plays a major role in Libyan life, and Islamist groups want to be part of the new government. Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama meets with Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, chairman of the Libyan Transitional National Council, at the United Nations in New York on Tuesday. Allan Tannenbaum-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Allan Tannenbaum-Pool/Getty Images

A fighter loyal to the Transitional National Council sits with money that has been donated to pay fighters at a checkpoint outside Bani Walid, Libya, on Monday. It was widely feared that ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi and his supporters spirited away much of the country's wealth. But those fears have yet to materialize, as Libya's central bank holdings appear to remain largely intact. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Caricatures of the ousted Gadhafi have sprung up all over Tripoli. This image of Gadhafi in chains is on a wall in the capital's Fashlum neighborhood. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

Musicians and other Libyans who once dared not express themselves are finding a new outlet on the country's newly freed radio stations. Shown here, a recent day at the studios of Radio Libya — once a state-run station — in Tripoli. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Jason Beaubien/NPR

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen speaks in Brussels on Sept. 5. Rasmussen calls NATO's operation in Libya a success that could serve as a model in the future. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Virginia Mayo/AP

Large mortar shells sit unguarded, and boxes that once held anti-aircraft missiles and other heavy weapons are strewn about arms depots around Tripoli. Rebels say they've taken some ammunition, but U.S. officials and others express fears the weapons could fall into the wrong hands. Ben Hubbard/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ben Hubbard/AP

Saadi Gadhafi, the son of the Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, arrives in Sydney, Australia, in 2005. Officials in Niger say Saadi was intercepted by local troops Sunday as he entered the country from Libya. Dan Peled /AP hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Peled /AP

Richard Engel is NBC News' chief foreign correspondent. Dan Nelken/NBCU hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Nelken/NBCU

Libyan rebel fighters raid a house in Tripoli on Tuesday as they search for supporters of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. The rebel leadership is trying to get various rebel factions to work together to create a new government and security force. Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images