Journalist Marie Colvin (second from left) poses with Libyan rebels in Misrata on June 4, 2011. She was killed in the besieged Syrian city of Homs on Wednesday. Later that day in Tripoli, fellow war correspondents gathered to remember her. Zohra Bensemra/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A worker walks in front of a refinery inside the Brega oil complex in Libya. Hussein Malla/AP hide caption

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Libya's Economy Faces New Tests After Gadhafi Era

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This abandoned village outside the city of Zintan was populated by pro-Gadhafi families from the Mushashya, a nomadic tribe from southern Libya. Fighters from Zintan, which rebelled against Gadhafi forces, are hoping they won't come back. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

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In Post-Gadhafi Libya, Enmities Continue To Smolder

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Libyan Transitional National Council fighters said Moammar Gadhafi was captured Thursday in this graffitti-filled culvert in Sirte.

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Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, shown in a 2008 file photo, ruled Libya for 42 years. Libya's new leaders say he was killed Thursday in his hometown of Sirte.

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Moammar Gadhafi Ruled Libya With An Iron Fist

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Anti-Gaddafi fighters celebrate the fall of Sirte in the town October 20, 2011.

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Grant Clark in Tripoli

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Libyans visit the destroyed Bab al-Azizia military barracks and compound of their country's ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi, in the southern suburbs of Tripoli, Libya.

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In Tripoli, Gadhafi's Palace Becomes People's Market

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A revolutionary fighter watches over two suspected Gadhafi loyalists in Sirte, Libya, last month. By some estimates, up to 30 to 40 percent of Libyans are sympathetic to former dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

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Gadhafi May Be Hard To Find, But Not His Supporters

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In Tripoli, Libya, women celebrate the revolution against Moammar Gadhafi's regime and call for a strengthening of women's rights, Sept. 2. After playing large but largely unsung roles during the uprising, women are now seeking a greater political role.

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Post-Revolution, Libyan Women Seek Expanded Roles

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Abdel Hakim Belhaj (center left), a prominent militia commander, walks with Transitional National Council Chairman Mustafa Abdel Jalil in Tripoli on Sept. 10. The battle to oust Moammar Gadhafi produced a number of leaders who will have to work together to form a new government. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Libya's Newest Concern: Looming Political Battles

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Libyans flee on foot along the main road heading west, away from Sirte, on Tuesday. Sirte, cut off from the rest of the country, is the last major town controlled by forces loyal to toppled dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Gaia Anderson/AP hide caption

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In Libya, Some Just Learning Of Gadhafi's Downfall

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Libyan rebels pray before going out on patrol outside the port city of Misrata on April 30. Religion plays a major role in Libyan life, and Islamist groups want to be part of the new government. Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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What Role Will Islamists Play In Libya?

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President Obama meets with Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, chairman of the Libyan Transitional National Council, at the United Nations in New York on Tuesday. Allan Tannenbaum-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama Praises Libya's Political Transition

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