Striving For A Safer Table Saw Table saws are the country's most dangerous commonly used power tool. Forty-thousand Americans end up in emergency rooms every year with injuries — 4,000 of them suffer amputations, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Safety advocates say a new technology could prevent most of those injuries.

The SawStop saw can sense a slight electrical current that human fingers (and hot dogs) create. When it senses the current, the saw triggers a safety brake, which stops the blade in less than 5/1,000th of a second. Courtesy of SawStop hide caption

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Courtesy of SawStop

Sharp Edge: One Man's Quest To Improve Saw Safety

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Making the Case for a Safer Table Saw

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Table-Saw Technology Aims to Save Fingers

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