Stigma Hinders Treatment For Postpartum Depression()  

Dorothy Mwesiga with her third child. Mwesiga was treated with antidepressant drugs and talk therapy for her postpartum depression.

August 1, 2011 Nearly 1 in 7 new mothers in the U.S. have a prolonged period of overwhelming depression or anxiety after giving birth. This postpartum depression occurs in the developing world, too. But psychiatrists say it's hard to get doctors interested in treating it. Many are not trained for it, and insurance companies often don't reimburse for it.

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Later In Life, Pregnancy Becomes A Numbers Game()  

Melissa Gray, with her two sons, Thomas and baby Perry.

July 19, 2011 At 38, All Things Considered producer Melissa Gray had a less than 10 percent chance of natural conception. When she got pregnant, doctors said her baby had a 1-in-66 chance of chromosomal disorders. Not only was he that 1 in 66, he had an abnormality so rare, there weren't any numbers to predict it.

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Doctors To Pregnant Women: Wait At Least 39 Weeks()  

A rendering of a 36-week fetus in the womb.

July 18, 2011 A full-term pregnancy lasts 40 weeks, but some women are now electing to deliver two or three weeks early. Even though 37 weeks is still considered full term, studies show that babies born even a few weeks too early are at greater risk for health problems than those who are born later.

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SIDS: Many Deaths No Longer A Mystery()  

Many  cases once thought to be sudden infant death syndrome are now believed to be  accidents caused by unsafe sleep practices. The image above shows a crib with a teddy bear and bumper — items the American Academy of Pediatrics warns against putting in your baby's crib.

July 15, 2011 For years, little was known about why babies died suddenly and unexpectedly in their sleep. But now, many of these deaths are believed to be preventable accidents caused by unsafe sleep practices. That's led some to question whether the term sudden infant death syndrome is still relevant.

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Group Prenatal Care: Strength In Numbers()  

Midwife Ana Luisa Ralston talks with Rosa Lainez (right) and Andrea Lopez about issues related to their upcoming deliveries during the Group Prenatal Care class at the Upper Cardozo Health Center in Washington. Here, Ralston demonstrates a position to assume during labor.

July 13, 2011 In a growing trend called centering, a group of women meet for collective medical visits throughout their pregnancies, getting advice from professionals and each other on things like nutrition, postpartum depression and breast-feeding. The goal: putting health care in the patients' hands.

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A Prenatal Surgery For Spina Bifida Comes Of Age()  

Surgical fellow Pablo Laje (left) and Dr. Scott Adzick finish prenatal surgery on Sarah White. Her fetus has spina bifida — a hole in the lower back that exposes the spinal cord.

July 11, 2011 Spina bifida, a spinal cord defect, affects about 1,500 U.S. pregnancies each year. Just this year, surgery to correct this birth defect while the fetus is still in the womb has moved past the experimental phase. While the surgery doesn't guarantee a perfect outcome, sometimes the results are truly amazing.

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Why Black Women, Infants Lag In Birth Outcomes()  

July 8, 2011 Across the country, black women fare worse than white women in almost every aspect of reproductive health. And black infants are more than twice as likely as white infants to die before their first birthdays. States like Delaware are spending millions to improve those odds.

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