Under Suspicion Since Sept. 11, the federal government has been coordinating with private businesses at popular sites, from shopping malls to sports stadiums, to spot and interrogate "suspicious persons." But an investigation by NPR and the Center for Investigative Reporting raises questions about whether private security agents are harassing innocent people.

The Mall of America in Bloomington, Minn., has implemented a security program aimed at aiding the government identify suspected terrorists. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Mall Counterterrorism Files ID Mostly Minorities

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The Mall of America, one of the nation's largest shopping and entertainment venues, is also home to its own counterterrorism unit. Dawn Villela/AP hide caption

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Dawn Villela/AP

Under Suspicion At The Mall Of America

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