Forgotten Treasures Of Science In museums around the world, there are artifacts that once made headlines. They may be locked away in a drawer or on display but hardly noticed now that their impact is forgotten. But each of these artifacts has an intriguing back story, one which describes the history and process of science and teaches us we how we have developed and deepened our scientific understanding of the world in which we live.

Beneath 8,200 feet of water, the Alvin submarine scopes out the Pacific's seafloor in the 1970s. The geologists aboard weren't searching for life — they were on the hunt for hot spots and undersea thermal vents. Courtesy of Kathy Crane hide caption

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Courtesy of Kathy Crane

The Deep-Sea Find That Changed Biology

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When the T. rex skeleton was first put on display, it was presented standing vertically, in this Godzilla-like pose, as seen at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History around 1950. Recent studies show the dinosaur actually kept its body horizontal. Watch the videos here to see how T. rex walked. Carnegie Museum of Natural History hide caption

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Carnegie Museum of Natural History

Bone To Pick: First T. Rex Skeleton, Complete At Last

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