A Look At North Korean Ideology
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North Korea Formally Announces Next Leader
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This image, released by the North Korean Central News Agency, was taken within seconds of the one above. An analysis shows that it was digitally altered, removing the cluster of men on the left edge and enhancing the perfect line of mourners. KCNA/EPA /Landov hide caption

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A television frame grab taken from North Korean TV today (Dec. 29, 2011) shows Kim Jong Un during a memorial service for his father, Kim Jong Il. North Korean TV/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Mike Shuster, reporting from Seoul
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Pyongyang Stages Dramatic Funeral For Kim Jong Il
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This photo provided by Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) shows Kim Jong Un, center, with his hand on the limousine bearing his father Kim Jong Il's body during the funeral procession in Pyongyang. Korean Central News Agency hide caption

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In North Korea, A Dramatic Farewell To Kim Jong Il
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North Korea Prepares To Bury Kim Jong Il
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North Korea's Economy Is In Need Of An Overhaul
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South Korean soldiers face a North Korean soldier standing at the border village of Panmunjom in the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea on Thursday. North Korea's neighbors are reassessing their policies following the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il. Wally Santana/AP hide caption

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With N. Korea In Flux, Neighbors Reassess Policies
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Hundreds of North Koreans queue up to mourn the death of Kim Jong Il in front of a portrait of him in Pyongyang's Kim Il Sung Square on Wednesday. With preparations for next week's state funeral still under way, attention is turning to Kim's son and heir apparent, Kim Jong Un. AP hide caption

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North Korea Awaits Kim Jong Un's Opening Moves
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Park Sang-nak, a North Korean defector, displays anti-North Korea leaflets before sending them by balloon into North Korea, at Imjinggak peace park in South Korea near the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two Koreas on Wednesday. Defectors from the North are hoping the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il may provide an opportunity for political change. Yang Hoi-Sung/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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With Kim's Death, Defectors See Chance For Change
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Kim Jong Un (center) pays his respects to his father, former leader Kim Jong Il, who is lying in state at the Kumsusan Memorial Palace in Pyongyang in this still picture taken from video footage aired by Korean Central TV of North Korea on Dec. 20. Reuters TV/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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In North Korea, Lavish Praise For The Heir Apparent
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South Korea's nuclear envoys visit a warehouse with unused nuclear fuel rods at North Korea's main nuclear plant in Yongbyon, North Korea, in 2009. Following the death of Kim Jong Il, it is not clear how a new leader, presumably Kim Jong Un, will deal with the nuclear program. Anonymous/South Korean Foreign Ministry/AP hide caption

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How Will A New Leader Handle North Korea's Nukes?
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Kim Jong Un, who is expected to become North Korea's next leader, claps after inspecting the construction site of a power station. This undated photo was released by the Korean Central News Agency on Nov. 4, 2010. AP hide caption

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