Dunya Mikhail is an Iraqi-American poet who teaches in Michigan. She has published five books in Arabic and two in English. Michael Smith/Courtesy of Dunya Mikhail hide caption

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Michael Smith/Courtesy of Dunya Mikhail

Revisiting Iraq Through The Eyes Of An Exiled Poet

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The Case For Being Concise: Short Poems That Speak Volumes

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Richard Blanco reads his poem "One Today" during President Obama's second inaugural, on Jan. 21. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Inaugural Poet Richard Blanco: 'I Finally Felt Like I Was Home'

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Iambic pentameter, a type of poetic line which Shakespeare often wrote, appears on Twitter as well. A program called Pentametron collects such tweets and turns them into poetry. Source image: AP hide caption

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Source image: AP

Pentametron Reveals Unintended Poetry of Twitter Users

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Horst Faas/Associated Press

In A North Vietnamese Prison, Sharing Poems With 'Taps On The Walls'

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American poet Robert Frost, shown here in 1955, died on Jan. 29, 1963. Now, 50 years after his death, a rare collection of letters, audio and photographs sheds new light on his religious beliefs. AP hide caption

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AP

Rare Robert Frost Collection Surfaces 50 Years After His Death

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William Shakespeare, depicted in this 17th century painting, penned his sonnets on parchment. Now his words have found a new home ... in twisting strands of DNA. Attributed to John Taylor/National Portrait Gallery hide caption

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Attributed to John Taylor/National Portrait Gallery

Shall I Encode Thee In DNA? Sonnets Stored On Double Helix

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John Keats' poetry lends itself to memorization particularly well. Fortunately, you can learn his texts by heart without having to adopt his moody pose. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Emily Musette Hays performs in the 2012 Poetry Out Loud finals in Washington, D.C. The U.S. competition served as a model for the U.K.'s Poetry By Heart contest. James Kegley/The Poetry Foundation hide caption

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James Kegley/The Poetry Foundation

U.K. Asks Students To Learn Poetry 'By Heart,' Not By Rote

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Poet Richard Blanco is the author of City of a Hundred Fires, Directions to the Beach of the Dead and Looking for the Gulf Motel. Nico Tucci/Courtesy Richard Blanco hide caption

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Nico Tucci/Courtesy Richard Blanco

Richard Blanco Will Be First Latino Inaugural Poet

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Four U.S. soldiers, runners for the 315th Infantry, pose in France in November 1918. The troops reportedly carried official orders to Lt. Col. Bunt near Etraye, France, shortly before noon, Nov. 11, 1918, announcing that the armistice had been signed, thereby ending World War I. AP hide caption

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WWI Poetry: On Veterans Day, The Words Of War

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Idra Novey visits NPR headquarters in Washington. Ryan Smith/NPR hide caption

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NewsPoet: Idra Novey Writes The Day In Verse

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