Workers brush cashmere goats in South Gobi on Bat-Erdene Badam's family farm. Cashmere wool, milk and meat are the main commodities for Mongolia's herders. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia
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Tseren-ochir is a superintendent at Oyu Tolgoi mine who goes by the name "Augie" because it's easier for the foreigners he works with to pronounce. He is overseeing workers digging a nearly 5,000-foot-deep shaft down to reach the copper ore. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mongolians Scramble For A Share Of Mining Wealth
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Herder Bat-Erdene Badam's mother. Khishigdelger Adiya, surveys the land around her home. She stands near what she described as a "sacred well" that has recently gone dry. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mongolia's Dilemma: Who Gets The Water?
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The mine at Oyu Tolgoi, Turquoise Hill in Mongolian, will be one of the world's largest copper mines in about five years. An employee holds up a small sample of the oxidized copper that gave the mine its name. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Mineral-Rich Mongolia Rapidly Becoming 'Mine-golia'
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