Cities Project Cities Project NPR's Series On Urban Life In The 21st Century

Families in a predominantly Latino youth soccer league gather for matches in Aurora. Hispanics make up nearly a third of the city's population, according to the 2010 Census. Megan Verlee for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Megan Verlee for NPR

Senegalese vendor Cheikh Fall prepares his stall in front of Brooks Brothers on 51st Street, just off the Avenue of the Americas in New York City. Fall runs an association of Senegalese vendors that deals with the city over licensing and regulations. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Art Silverman/NPR

Part of the wall that was built in 1940 has since been painted over with a mural. Detroit1701.org/Collection maintained at the Univ. of Michigan by Ren Farley and Judy Mullin hide caption

itoggle caption Detroit1701.org/Collection maintained at the Univ. of Michigan by Ren Farley and Judy Mullin

An illustration for a park proposed for Washington's old 11th Street Bridge. If realized, the park would span the Anacostia River, linking the Capitol Hill neighborhood with lower-income Anacostia. Ed Estes/Courtesy of D.C. Office of Planning hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Estes/Courtesy of D.C. Office of Planning

The skyline of the northern Brickell neighborhood in downtown Miami. Its residential population has more than doubled in the past decade. Marc Averette/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

itoggle caption Marc Averette/Wikimedia Commons

Some scientists predict that by 2050, climate change and an accompanying rise in sea level will lead to frequent flooding in Boston. jeffgun/Flickr hide caption

itoggle caption jeffgun/Flickr

A Metro Light Rail train rolls by the Devine Legacy apartment building along Central Avenue in Phoenix. The energy-efficient complex includes 65 "urban style" apartments. Courtesy of Mica Thomas Mulloy hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Mica Thomas Mulloy

The central Chinese city of Wuhan has a population of 10 million people, more than New York City. Both Chinese and foreigners are flocking to Wuhan, the GDP of which is expected to double in five years. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank Langfitt/NPR