Deilephila elpenor, commonly called the elephant hawk-moth, has specialized eyes that don't reflect light. Such moths inspired scientists to invent an anti-glare coating for smart screens. Ullstein Bild/Getty Images hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Getty Images

A brown dwarf can give off some light, allowing scientists — professional or volunteer — to search for the object as it moves across the sky. Chuck Carter and Gregg Hallinan/Caltech/NASA hide caption

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Chuck Carter and Gregg Hallinan/Caltech/NASA

Citizen Scientists Comb Images To Find An 'Overexcited Planet'

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Mohammad Al Abdallah, the executive director of the Syria Justice and Accountability Centre, shows a video that was posted to YouTube of illegal cluster bombing in Syria. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Activists Build Human Rights Abuse Cases With Help From Cellphone Videos

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This image shows Jupiter's south pole, as seen by NASA's Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles. The oval features are cyclones, up to 600 miles in diameter. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles

Juno Spacecraft Reveals Spectacular Cyclones At Jupiter's Poles

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A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

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Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

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In an artist's rendering, a gigantic, cassowarylike dinosaur named Beibeilong, which lived some 90 million years ago, incubates its eggs. Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications hide caption

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Zhao Chuang/Nature Communications

A prototype MOF-based water-collection device is set up for testing on the roof of a building on the MIT campus. Courtesy Evelyn Yang, MIT hide caption

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Courtesy Evelyn Yang, MIT

Researchers Find A New Way To Make Water From Thin Air

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Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

A tardigrade, known as a water bear, is shown magnified 250 times. These tiny aquatic invertebrates can go without water for 10 years, surviving as a dessicated shell. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images

How One Of The World's Toughest Creatures Can Bring Itself Back To Life

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An artist's concept shows the WISE spacecraft in its orbit around Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Have Spare Time? Try To Discover A Planet

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Carmen Bachmann founded "Chance for Science," a website that connects refugee academics with scientists working in Germany. Thomas Victor for NPR hide caption

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Thomas Victor for NPR

While Others Saw Refugees, This German Professor Saw Human Potential

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Hanan Isweiri is a Ph.D. student at Colorado State University. She flew to Libya in January to visit with family after her father's death. She was able to re-enter the U.S. Saturday. Courtesy of Colorado State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Colorado State University

Travel Ban Keeps Scientists Out Of The Lab

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