AnthroTronix Founder and CEO Corinna Lathan, at the company's offices in Silver Spring, Md. Courtesy of AnthroTronix, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of AnthroTronix, Inc.

Envisioning The Future With Inventor Cori Lathan

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Jonathan Wilker holds up a group of oysters from a tank in his lab at Purdue University. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Davis/NPR

Why A Hoosier State Scientist Is Stuck On Oysters

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This image represents a chunk, or "cube," of brain. Each different color represents a different neuron, and the goal of the EyeWire game is to figure out how these tangled neurons connect to each other. Players look at a slice from this cube and try to identify the boundaries of each cell. It isn't easy, and it takes practice. You can try it for yourself at eyewire.org. EyeWire hide caption

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EyeWire

Wanna Play? Computer Gamers Help Push Frontier Of Brain Research

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Car commercial? Nope. Jessica Richman, Zachary Apte (center) and William Ludington are looking to the crowd for money to fund uBiome, which will sequence the genetic code of microbes that live on and inside humans. Courtesy of uBiome hide caption

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Courtesy of uBiome

Scientist Gets Research Donations From Crowd Funding

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A drawing from Michael Davidson's 2012 patent for "Toothbrush And Method Of Using The Same." Patent 8,108,962/U.S. Patent and Trademark Office hide caption

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Patent 8,108,962/U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

The Quest For The Perfect Toothbrush

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NASA's Mars rover Curiosity dug up five scoops of sand from a patch nicknamed "Rocknest." A suite of instruments called SAM analyzed Martian soil samples, but the findings have not yet been released. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Big News From Mars? Rover Scientists Mum For Now

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Catherine Wong used electrical components to build an electrocardiogram that sends data by cellphone. Courtesy of Catherine Wong hide caption

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Courtesy of Catherine Wong

Roger Angel, an astronomer at the University of Arizona, stands in front of his new project: a solar tracker. Angel wants to use the device to harness Arizona's abundant sunlight and turn it into usable energy. Jason Millstein for NPR hide caption

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Jason Millstein for NPR

Telescope Innovator Shines His Genius On New Fields

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Adam Steltzner, the leader of the rover's entry, descent and landing engineering team, cheers after Curiosity touched down safely on Mars on Sunday. Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty Images

So You Landed On Mars. Now What?

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NASA engineer Adam Steltzner led the team that designed a crazy new approach to landing on Mars. Rachael Porter for NPR hide caption

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Rachael Porter for NPR

Crazy Smart: When A Rocker Designs A Mars Lander

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