An artist's concept shows the WISE spacecraft in its orbit around Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Have Spare Time? Try To Discover A Planet

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Carmen Bachmann founded "Chance for Science," a website that connects refugee academics with scientists working in Germany. Thomas Victor for NPR hide caption

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Thomas Victor for NPR

While Others Saw Refugees, This German Professor Saw Human Potential

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Hanan Isweiri is a Ph.D. student at Colorado State University. She flew to Libya in January to visit with family after her father's death. She was able to re-enter the U.S. Saturday. Courtesy of Colorado State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Colorado State University

Travel Ban Keeps Scientists Out Of The Lab

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The micromotor device may someday be used to deliver antibiotics to the stomach. Angewandte Chemie International Edition hide caption

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Angewandte Chemie International Edition

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

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Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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Researchers from the Max Planck Institute excavate the East Gallery of Denisova Cave in Siberia in August 2010. With ancient bone fragments so hard to come by, being able to successfully filter dirt for the DNA of extinct human ancestors can open new doors, research-wise. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Dust To Dust: Scientists Find DNA Of Human Ancestors In Cave Floor Dirt

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Having volunteers who are learning German answer questions about grammar and semantics of the language while inside an MRI machine might show particular patterns in brain changes, researchers say. They hope their study could offer clues to how the brain best learns a second language. selimaksan/Getty Images hide caption

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selimaksan/Getty Images

Learning German In The Name Of Science And Cross-Cultural Collaboration

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Astronomers searching for an undiscovered planet in the outer solar system hope to catch a glimpse of it Thursday through the Subaru Telescope located on top of Hawaii's Mauna Kea mountain. Courtesy of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

Astronomers Seeking Planet 9 Hope To Soon Catch A Glimpse

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Jonathan Coleman and his son compare graphene-infused Silly Putty (left) with the unadulterated kids stuff. Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin hide caption

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Naoise Culhane/Amber Center, Trinity College Dublin

Adding A Funny Form Of Carbon To Silly Putty Creates A Heart Monitor

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The huge sun shield of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope must be carefully folded to fit into a space about the size of a school bus before takeoff. Chris Gunn/NASA hide caption

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Chris Gunn/NASA

Some Assembly Required: New Space Telescope Will Take Shape After Launch

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