Floodwaters from Superstorm Sandy destroyed the first floor of this house in Staten Island, New York. Most of the people who drowned during the storm died in their homes in low-lying areas of New York and New Jersey. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Jagdesh Trivedi believes his green card and Social Security card were stolen, along with more than $200 and two pairs of shoes. Fred Mogul/WNYC hide caption

itoggle caption Fred Mogul/WNYC

Daniel Riscoe, Jenna Hart, Anthony Chau and Caroline Lloyd (all students from the Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J.) carry donated Christmas trees across Island Beach. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Adam Cole/NPR

Torahs are draped on chairs and tables at Temple Israel of Long Beach, N.Y. The synagogue was flooded during Superstorm Sandy, but hasn't received federal aid. Temple Israel hide caption

itoggle caption Temple Israel

Highly detailed sonar systems aboard the research vessel Pritchard gave researchers a clear view of the sediment on the seafloor off Long Island. Courtesy of John Goff/University Of Texas hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of John Goff/University Of Texas

People walk past a closed business affected by Hurricane Sandy in the heavily damaged South Street Seaport in New York City in December. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Much of the money from the Hurricane Sandy relief bill the House of Representatives passed will fund beach and infrastructure restoration projects in areas such as Mantoloking, N.J., seen on Oct. 31. Doug Mills/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Doug Mills/AP

Deborah Rassi, 59, cleans her new kitchen. She's holding a bag of donated clothing, one of many that volunteers left in the new mobile home. Neena Satija/WNPR hide caption

itoggle caption Neena Satija/WNPR

A woman walks past a cabana complex pulled off its foundations by Superstorm Sandy in Sea Bright, N.J., in November. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Seth Wenig/AP

Natisha Laws near her hotel in the middle of Times Square. She and her family were placed at the DoubleTree in mid-November by FEMA. They lost their rental apartment during Superstorm Sandy and have been struggling to recover. Cindy Rodriguez for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Cindy Rodriguez for NPR

Each FEMA-registered family with kids can pick out toys at the volunteer-run Staten Island store. Margot Adler/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Margot Adler/NPR