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United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta at the Delano grape workers strike in Delano, Calif., 1966. The strike set in motion the modern farmworkers movement. Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield hide caption

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Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield

For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

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Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

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In the 1950s, the poultry industry began dunking birds in antibiotic baths. It was supposed to keep meat fresher and healthier. That's not what happened, as Maryn McKenna recounts in her new book. Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Express/Getty Images

Hamilton-inspired cupcake toppers. It was only a matter of time before fans of the Broadway hit sought out culinary tributes to their most treasured folk hero. Courtesy of Alexis Murphy hide caption

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Courtesy of Alexis Murphy

Berlin, Germany: A candid photograph of Eva Braun with Adolf Hitler at the dining table. A new book explores the lives of six women through food, and Hitler's mistress is a startling inclusion. But what Braun ate reflected a "perpetual enactment of her own daydream" against a barbaric backdrop. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann/Getty Images

A group of men with full glasses proudly pose with their keg of beer in San Francisco, 1895. Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Underwood Archives/Getty Images

How The Story Of Beer Is The Story Of America

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap

Guests attend a Refugees Welcome dinner at Lapis restaurant in Washington, D.C. The goals of the evening: to bring locals together with refugees in their community and to break barriers by breaking bread. Beck Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Beck Harlan/NPR

Analysts say that the experience of shopping at Whole Foods might change in the near future now that the retailer is being bought by Amazon. Stephen Hilger/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Hilger/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Favorite Ramadan drinks vary by country. In Jordan and Lebanon, tamer hindi, a tamarind-based beverage (seen above), is often offered alongside qamar al-deen, a thick apricot nectar. Amy E. Robertson for NPR hide caption

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Amy E. Robertson for NPR
Courtesy of Wendy MacNaughton

An Illustrated Guide To Master The Elements Of Cooking — Without Recipes

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Mike and Amy Mills' famous smoked chicken wings, as prepared in Ari Shapiro's backyard. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

'Praise The Lard': A Barbecue Legend Shows Us How To Master Smoked Chicken Wings

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Some 55 percent of families with kids that receive food stamp benefits are earning wages. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on. Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images

Susan Morgan, age 5, holds a bunch of bananas in Ponchatoula, La., in 1955. Susan was diagnosed with celiac disease and was prescribed a diet of 200 bananas weekly. AP hide caption

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AP
Yamtono Sardi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

If Raw Fruits Or Veggies Give You A Tingly Mouth, It's A Real Syndrome

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Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

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Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

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At the turn of the 20th century, when access to professional care was spotty, many cookbooks served up recipes for the sick — some (brandy) more appealing than others (toast water). Even the Joy Of Cooking included sickbed recipes up through the 1943 edition. George Marks/Getty Images hide caption

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George Marks/Getty Images