Harriet Tubman, pictured between 1860 and 1875. The woman who will soon become the first African-American to grace an American currency note self-funded many of her heroic raids to save slaves by cooking. H.B. Lindsley/Library of Congress via AP hide caption

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A Passover Seder table. During Passover, Jews avoid leavened bread. But whether legumes, corn and rice are OK has long been a point of contention among Jews of European and Middle Eastern ancestry. Now, rabbis have weighed in. Reza/Getty Images hide caption

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Beans And Rice For Passover? A Divisive Question Gets The Rabbis' OK
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The World Resources Institute says you don't have to bid burgers bye-bye in order to reduce the environmental footprint of what you eat. For Americans, cutting back on beef (but not eliminating it altogether) could go a long way, it says. iStockphoto hide caption

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The libertine Falstaff sits with a woman on his lap and a tankard in his hand in an illustrated scene from one of William Shakespeare's Henry IV plays. Kean Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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There's a growing body of evidence challenging the notion that low-fat dairy is best. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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The Full-Fat Paradox: Dairy Fat Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk
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Elizabeth Bennett, director of partnerships for Together We Bake, and Nikki Yates, program participant, place cookie dough they've just made onto baking sheets. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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This Bakery Offers A Second Chance For Women After Prison
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The Tampa Bay Times spent two months investigating where local eateries were really getting their ingredients. Many of their "farm to table" claims proved to be bogus. B and G Images/Getty Images hide caption

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'Farm To Fable'? Tampa Probe Finds Many Restaurants Lie About Sourcing
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Japanese food was once derided, but it's now in the canon of haute cuisine, says author Krishnendu Ray. How we value a culture's cuisine in our society, he says, often reflects the status of those who cook it. Alex Green/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Katsu curry: The British navy brought its anglicized interpretations of Indian cuisines to Imperial Japan in the 19th century. By the end of the century, the Japanese navy had adapted the British version of curry. Alpha/Flickr hide caption

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A Bolivian farmer harvests organic quinoa in his fields in Puerto Perez, Bolivia. Some researchers are working with quinoa farmers in Bolivia and Peru to try to develop internal markets for threatened varieties — for example, in hospital and school food programs. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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These shrimp "Peking ravioli" (aka dumplings) were featured at the third annual Festival of Dumplings in 2014 — honoring Bostonian and celebrity chef Joyce Chen. Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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The modern broiler, or meat chicken, grows incredibly fast. But some critics say the bird — and the flavor of its meat — may suffer as a result. Whole Foods wants all of its suppliers to shift to slower-growing chicken breeds, like this one, seen at Arkansas-based Crystal Lake Farms. Courtesy of Crystal Lake Farms hide caption

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Why Whole Foods Wants A Slower-Growing Chicken
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A beehive at Frangiosa Farms, in Parker, Colo. The farm introduced an adopt-a-hive program in 2012. The one-time adoption fees per hive range from $45 to $130 (the latter gets you three jars of honey). Courtesy of Nick French/Frangiosa Farms hide caption

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A batch of sourdough starter can live indefinitely, but it also requires a certain amount of care and feeding. In Sweden, bakers jetting off for vacation can leave their precious starters in the care of a sitter at the airport. iStockphoto hide caption

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Boba 7, the speakeasy at the back of downtown Los Angeles restaurant Soi 7, serves boba cocktails made with beer or the Korean alcohol soju, in addition to an inventive nonalcoholic menu. Courtesy of Boba 7 hide caption

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Rick Bayless is a master of Mexican cuisine. He's also a white guy from Oklahoma. Over the years, that has made him the target of criticism. Who gets to be the ambassador of a cuisine? Sergi Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Left: Julia Ward Howe, pictured during her honeymoon in England. Right: Her husband, Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe. He would soon prove controlling of every aspect of her life, including what she ate. The Yellow House Papers: The Laura E. Richards Collection, Gardiner Library Association and Maine Historical Society, Coll. 2085, RG10, F6; Samuel Gridley Howe, 1857. Courtesy of Perkins School for the Blind Archives. hide caption

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Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, Isaac Newton, Gandhi, Pythagoras, Balzac, Marie Curie — scanning history's greatest minds, we find many were inspired by certain food or drink, repulsed by others, or had some very peculiar dining habits. Katherine Du/NPR hide caption

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