The rellenong manok at La Cocina de Tita Moning, a restaurant in Manila. Chef Suzette Montinola uses a traditional recipe from the 1930s that belonged to her grandmother. Aurora Almendral for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Aurora Almendral for NPR

A woman prepares a Japanese Christmas cake at the Patisserie Akira Cake shop on Dec. 23, 2011. The sponge cake is drenched in symbolic meaning. Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images

Wrapped in gold and silver foil, chocolate gelt are often handed out as a little treat for children (and adults) during Hanukkah. Turns out, the tradition is rooted in real money. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Chris Lohring founded Notch Brewing in 2010. The company's lineup includes a Czech pilsner, a Belgian saison and an India pale ale. All of the brews are session beers — meaning their alcohol by volume, or A.B.V., is less than 5 percent. Courtesy of Notch Brewing hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Notch Brewing

When it comes to salty french fries or pizza served at lunch, schools may get more time to dial back sodium content, thanks to a provision in the federal spending bill headed for a vote on Capitol Hill. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Mattheos Koffas (left), a biochemical engineer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Andrew Jones, a graduate student in his lab, with a flask of microbe-produced antioxidants. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Rotten, fermented fruit has some nutritional value, and may have looked pretty good to our hungry ancient ancestors. Evolving the ability to metabolize the alcohol in fermented fruit may have helped us adapt to a changing climate 10 million years ago, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

Samples of carrots cooked three ways are placed on a table for the kids at Walker-Jones Educational Campus, in Washington, D.C., to sample after they have finished lunch. The crowd favorite will later end up on the school lunch menu. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Claire Eggers/NPR

John Umland (left) and John Torrens gather donated cans of food in 2011 in Rohnert Park, Calif., for the group Neighbors Organized Against Hunger. Hunger advocates say a lot of nutritionally dense food like canned tuna and beans can be cheaper than processed food. Kent Porter/ZUMA Press/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Kent Porter/ZUMA Press/Corbis

One of America's favorite bites: the hotdog. Here, a man and women enjoy the dogs at a California fair in 1905. Courtesy of Sourcebooks hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Sourcebooks

California sheep rancher Dan Macon had to sell almost half of his herd because the drought left him without enough feed. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Kirk Siegler/NPR

Global food giant Unilever, which owns the ubiquitous Hellmann's brand, is suing Hampton Creek, the maker of Just Mayo, an egg-free spread made from peas, sorghum and other plants. Richard Levine/Corbis; Courtesy of Hampton Creek hide caption

itoggle caption Richard Levine/Corbis; Courtesy of Hampton Creek

Slow-cooked New York bear meat has been described as like beef stew, but with "a little stronger texture and a little gamier flavor." David Sommerstein /North Country Public Radio hide caption

itoggle caption David Sommerstein /North Country Public Radio

These wooden tokens are handed out to shoppers who use SNAP benefits to purchase fresh produce at the Crossroads Farmers Market near Takoma Park, Md. Customers receive tokens worth twice the amount of money withdrawn from their SNAP benefits card — in other words, they get "double bucks." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Dan Charles/NPR

Edgar Meadows has been growing Bloody Butcher corn, an heirloom variety, for generations. The name Bloody Butcher refers to the flecks of red mixed onto the white kernels, like a butcher's apron, Meadows says. Roxy Todd/West Viginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

itoggle caption Roxy Todd/West Viginia Public Broadcasting