In 1747, members of the notorious Hawkhurst Gang carried out a brazen midnight raid on the King's Custom House in Poole, England: They broke in and stole back their impounded tea. What followed over the next weeks would shock even hardened criminals. E. Keble Chatterton - King's Cutters and Smugglers 1700-1855/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Harvesting oranges near Arcadia, Fla. The sacks that workers carry weigh about 90 pounds when they are full of fruit. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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The Big Bite Burger from Guy's American Kitchen and Bar in New York's Times Square. In 2012, New York Times restaurant critic Pete Wells penned an infamous takedown of the restaurant. Krista/Flickr hide caption

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The words "sherbet" and "sorbet" derive from the Persian sharbat; biryani comes from biryān; and julep started as the Persian gul-āb (rose water), then entered Arabic as julāb, and from there entered a number of European languages, with the "b" softened into a "p." my_amii/Flickr, Jay Galvin/Flickr, Justin van Dyke/Flickr hide caption

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Brother William Valle of the Institute of the Incarnate Word in Chillum, Md., loads potatoes onto his cart at the Capitol Area Food Bank, in Washington, D.C. A new government initiative seeks to engage faith-based groups on food waste — for instance, by using their existing relationships with food banks to redirect excess food to the hungry. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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One of the banana plants in the collection at the USDA's Tropical Agriculture Research Station in Puerto Rico. It's just one of many banana collections around the world that might just hold the key to stopping a fungus's deadly reach. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Clockwise from top left: General Mills, Nestle, Dunkin Donuts, Panera, Tyson Chicken and McDonald's, among other big food companies, made commitments in 2015 to change the way they prepare and procure their food products. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty hide caption

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José Anzaldo, the son of migrant farmworkers, has been to seven schools in three years. He's the subject of a documentary premiering Dec. 28 on PBS. Kate Schermerhorn/Courtesy of ITVS hide caption

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Millet isn't just one grain but, rather, a ragbag group of small-seeded grasses. Hardy, gluten-free and nutritious, millet has become an "it" grain in recent years. billy1125/Flickr hide caption

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The Windsor Court Hotel in New Orleans began holding afternoon tea in 1984. A representative says the hotel held daily afternoon tea times until Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005. It still serves afternoon tea a few days a week. Sara Essex Bradley/Windsor Court Le Salon hide caption

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"Figgy pudding" is a traditional Christmas dessert that normally contains no figs — and isn't what Americans usually mean by "pudding." Edward Shaw/iStockphoto hide caption

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There are so many opportunities to screw up pumpkin pie. But done right, it can win friends and influence people. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Author Joan Morgan says Beurré Superfin is one of her favorite pears. It's "truly delicious: very buttery, juicy, cream to pale yellow flesh, intensely rich with plenty of sugar lemony acidity," she writes in The Book of Pears. Courtesy of Joan Morgan hide caption

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Paul Lightfoot, CEO of BrightFarms, in his company's greenhouse in Lower Makefield Township, Pa. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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