Getting kids to eat veggies through subterfuge — say, by sneaking spinach into smoothies -- sets the bar too low, researchers say. Your child must actually learn to like veggies, weird textures and all. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

La Belle Limonadiere, hand coloured etching (1816). Lemonade was ubiquitous in mid-17th century Paris. Where the limonadiers went, piles of spent lemon peels followed. As rats nibbled on the peels, they killed off plague-infected fleas, Tom Nealon argues in his new book. Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press hide caption

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Courtesy of The British Library Board/The Overlook Press

Eating too much bacon, or too few whole grains, nuts and seeds, can influence your risk of death from heart disease. Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease and Type 2 diabetes are linked to diet. Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Taylor/Getty Images, John Lawson/Belhaven/Getty Images

Philippe Mora, whose father made life-saving baguettes during WWII, displays his graphic of his father, Georges Mora, and his godfather, Marcel Marceau, making mayonnaise together. Courtesy of NOISE Film PR hide caption

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Courtesy of NOISE Film PR

A new study of the dental plaques of three Neanderthals reveals surprising facts about their lives, including what they ate, the diseases that ailed them and how they self-medicated (and smooched). (Above) An illustration of Neanderthals in Spain shows them preparing to eat plants and mushrooms. Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC hide caption

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Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC

Some Neanderthals Were Vegetarian — And They Likely Kissed Our Human Ancestors

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As more research suggests some degree of dietary cholesterol is harmless, if not healthy, the egg's reputation is slowly returning. Yet some experts worry the science is being misinterpreted and spun. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart/NPR

From field to bakery, a loaf of bread packs a measurable environmental punch. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

What's The Environmental Footprint Of A Loaf Of Bread? Now We Know

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An illustration from 1875 depicts the survivors of the frigate Cospatrick, which caught fire off South Africa's Cape of Good Hope in November 1874. Of more than 470 people on board, just three ultimately survived, and they were reduced to cannibalism. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Many of the Japanese Americans incarcerated at Tule Lake had been farmers before the war. At camp, they were employed as field workers, often for $12 a month. Here, incarcerees work in a carrot field. Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives hide caption

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Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project via The National Archives

Freda DeKnight was Ebony's first food editor and author of a best-selling African-American cookbook in the 1940s. Her recipes presented a vision of black America that was often invisible in mainstream media. Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune hide caption

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Sierra Nicole Rhoden/Chicago Tribune

"Sell by" and "expiration" labels on food products may contribute to food waste by misleading consumers to throwing away perfectly good food. Now, two food industry associations are encouraging food companies to do away with these labels. Ryan Eskalis/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Eskalis/NPR

American writer, abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass edits a journal at his desk, late 1870s. Douglass was acutely conscious of being a literary witness to the inhumane institution of slavery he had escaped as a young man. He made sure to document his life in not one but three autobiographies. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Collinsville, Ill. A thriving American Indian city that rose to prominence after A.D. 900 owing to successful maize farming, it may have collapsed because of changing climate. Michael Dolan/Flickr hide caption

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Michael Dolan/Flickr

Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

A still from Budweiser's Super Bowl ad tells the story of one of Budweiser's founders. Budweiser via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Budweiser via YouTube/ Screenshot by NPR

Worshipful female followers fought for the Mad Monk's leftover bread crusts. His infamous sweet tooth led to his death. Or did it? A century later, rumors about Grigori Rasputin, Russia's czarina whisperer, still swirl. RGALI/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux hide caption

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RGALI/Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Vishwesh Bhatt is the executive chef of Snackbar, a restaurant in Oxford, Miss. And he's winning acclaim as one of the region's best chefs for Indian-inflected Southern fare that reflects a changing South. Danny Klimetz for NPR hide caption

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Danny Klimetz for NPR

Mississippi Masala: How A Native Of India Became A Southern Cooking Star

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