Ah, the cinnamon swirl: They're beloved by the Danish, but the traditional recipe for these pastries may be too spice-laden for European Union law. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Mark Karney found the recipe for his mother's Hungarian nut roll in a dusty recipe box after she passed away. After lots of experimentation, he figured out how to make it and has revived it as a Christmas tradition. Courtesy of Mark Karney hide caption

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Why We Hold Tight To Our Family's Holiday Food Traditions

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With our design, gingerbread families everywhere can enjoy the holidays without having to worry about their roofs caving in. Morgan Walker/NPR hide caption

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Dan Pashman of The Sporkful podcast suggests saucy pastas over meat: "They tend to hold up better to the chilling and reheating process." iStockphoto hide caption

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Flying This Holiday? Here Are A Few Tips To Survive Airline Food

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The deconstructed, hexagonal salad nicoise: perfect for all your gourmand geek friends. Courtesy of Chris-Rachel Oseland hide caption

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Sarah Ramirez runs an organization that brings excess produce to the hungry. Here, she gleans apples from a front yard. Scott Anger/KQED hide caption

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This Stanford Ph.D. Became A Fruit Picker To Feed California's Hungry

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Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms

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A customer scans the shelves at Community Shop, the U.K.'s first "social supermarket." The discount grocery stores are growing in popularity across Europe and are open exclusively to those in need. Courtesy of Community Shop hide caption

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Precious snack: In Tolkien's books, lembas was a special bread made by elves that could stay fresh for months — perfect for sustaining travelers on a long journey (or engaging in an all-day movie marathon.) Try it for elevenses. Beth Accomando for NPR hide caption

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An animal's ranking on the food chain depends on where its meals place on the ladder. That puts plants on the bottom (they make all their food), polar bears on top and people somewhere between pigs and anchovies. Lisa Brown for NPR hide caption

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A Safeway customer browses in the fruit and vegetable section at Safeway in Livermore, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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