An Arizona restaurant sold lion meat burgers in 2010 in an attempt to drum up business during the World Cup soccer tournament held in South Africa. Matt York/AP hide caption

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A pushcart fruit vendor at the Fulton fish market in New York City in 1943 Gordon Parks/Library of Congress hide caption

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Workers clear honey from dead beehives at a bee farm east of Merced, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Are Agriculture's Most Popular Insecticides Killing Our Bees?

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Tastes like chicken, but it's OK for Lent: Fried alligator, as served at New Orleans' Cochon restaurant. Chris Granger/Courtesy of Cochon hide caption

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Forget Fish Fridays: In Louisiana, Gator Is On The Lenten Menu

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A view of the medieval town of Ribadavia, in Galicia, in the north of Spain. José Antonio Gil Martínez/via Flickr hide caption

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Farmers harvest a sugar beet crop in Gilcrest, Colo. Matthew Staver/Landov hide caption

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Members of the Zeitun Women's Cooperative prepare a meal. These women take catering orders for special events, using the proceeds to help support their families in an area with "nearly universal male under- and unemployment," the authors of The Gaza Kitchen write. Courtesy of Laila El-Haddad and Maggie Schmitt hide caption

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Parents are currently advised to switch toddlers to reduced-fat milk at age 2. David M. Goehring/Via Flickr hide caption

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The cherry, prunus cerasus — specifically, the variety marasca — is the only plant that appears in the Manhattan cocktail in an easily recognizable form. But as author Amy Stewart explains, the maraschino garnish is far from the only horticultural element of the cocktail. See below for the rest of the ingredients in a Manhattan. Koehler's Medicinal Plants/Image courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden. http://www.botanicus.org hide caption

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'Drunken Botanist' Takes A Garden Tour Of The Liquor Cabinet

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Japanese women drink green tea during an outdoor tea ceremony in Kobe, Japan. Making the brew a daily habit may be protective against stroke. Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images hide caption

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A Daily Habit Of Green Tea Or Coffee Cuts Stroke Risk

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A man dressed as a skomorokh, a medieval East Slavic harlequin, distributes bliny in St. Petersburg, Russia, during the last day of Maslenitsa, March 1, 2009. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Maslenitsa Celebration Helps Russians Thaw From Winter

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