A marlin caught as bycatch by the California drift gillnet fishery. The conservation group Oceana called the fishery one of the "dirtiest" in the U.S. because of its high rate of discarded fish and other marine animals. Courtesy of NOAA hide caption

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Eating some foods high in saturated fat is not necessarily going to increase your risk of heart disease, a study shows, contrary to the dietary science of the past 40 years. Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/iStockphoto hide caption

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We love our morning coffee, but what's really in that piping hot cup of java? It's a powerful drug called caffeine. iStockphoto hide caption

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Wake Up And Smell The Caffeine. It's A Powerful Drug

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Philip James, Chairman of CustomVine, and Kevin Boyer, President and CEO of CustomVine, film a video to promote The Miracle Machine, which turns water into wine with the use of an app. Courtesy of The Miracle Machine hide caption

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Jefferson's Ocean bourbon is aged on the high seas, a technique that takes advantage of basic physical chemistry. The bottles sell for $200 a piece. Courtesy of OCEARCH hide caption

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The digester eggs at Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brooklyn contain millions of gallons of black sludge. Courtesy of New York City Department of Environmental Protection hide caption

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Turning Food Waste Into Fuel Takes Gumption And Trillions Of Bacteria

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