(Top left, clockwise) Macmen N' Cheese; chocolate ramen; udon and egg. (Bottom row) Ramen fritatta; cannellini beans and spinach; and southwest taco from the book Rah! Rah! Ramen. Sara Childs/ Courtesy of Interactive Direct hide caption

toggle caption Sara Childs/ Courtesy of Interactive Direct

The whirling, 3,200-pound puffing gun was used to produce cereals like Cheerios and Kix in the early 20th century. The Museum of Food and Drink plans to feature it in its first exhibition, on breakfast cereal. Courtesy of MOFAD hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of MOFAD

Kandinsky's Painting No. 201, on the left, was the inspiration for the salad on the right, which was used to test diners' appreciation of the dish. Museum of Modern Art; Crossmodal Research Laboratory hide caption

toggle caption Museum of Modern Art; Crossmodal Research Laboratory

Blue agaves grow in a plantation for the production of tequila in Arandas, Jalisco state, Mexico, in December 2010. In the past 20 years, tequila has become fashionable all over the world, demonstrating that producers' international sales strategy has been a great success. Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Hector Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images
Tequila Nation: Mexico Reckons With Its Complicated Spirit
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/323714694/325073894" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Writer Arlo Crawford (left) with his father, Jim Crawford, an elder statesman of the organic farming movement who dropped out of law school in 1972 to grow vegetables. Melanie McLean/Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co. hide caption

toggle caption Melanie McLean/Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.

New regulations on what can be called "Tennessee whiskey" have sparked a fight between the makers of Jack Daniel's and George Dickel, two best-selling brands. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

South Dakota-based meat processor Beef Products Inc. shows a sample of its lean, finely textured beef in September 2012. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP
'Pink Slime' Is Making A Comeback. Do You Have A Beef With That?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/322911060/323032831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yellowfin tuna; Chinook salmon; lingcod; Pacific halibut. Chang/iStockphoto; Debbi Smirnoff/iStockphoto; via TeachAGirlToFish; Andrea Pokrzywinski/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Chang/iStockphoto; Debbi Smirnoff/iStockphoto; via TeachAGirlToFish; Andrea Pokrzywinski/Flickr

Freshly picked weeds, hot from the fryer. Sarah Miles/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Sarah Miles/Flickr
A Sweet Solution For Dandelions: Eat 'Em To Beat 'Em
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/320763334/321392898" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The pillars of Caribbean cuisine, framing the front of a streetside stall. Ellen Silverman/Courtesy of Media Masters Publicity hide caption

toggle caption Ellen Silverman/Courtesy of Media Masters Publicity
Don't Be A Jerk. There's A Lot More To Island Cooking
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/320482216/320734965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Allen Peterson's farm, near the city of Turlock, Calif., lies next to a concrete-lined canal full of water. He's one of the lucky ones. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Dan Charles/NPR
California Farmers Ask: Hey Buddy, Can You Spare Some Water?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/317011698/320375670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript