A corn purchaser writes on his account in northwest China in 2012. In November 2013, officials began rejecting imports of U.S. corn when they detected traces of a new gene not yet approved in China. Peng Zhaozhi/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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More than 170 volunteers in the Brattleboro, Vt., area have contributed urine to the Rich Earth Institute field trials. Mike Earley/Courtesy of Rich Earth Institute hide caption

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Bulleit is one of 50 different brands a food blogger says is using whiskey from an Indiana factory. Mike McCune/Flickr hide caption

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The Salt

Why Your 'Small-Batch' Whiskey Might Taste A Lot Like The Others

A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."

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A fisherman pulls a basket filled with anchovies aboard a fishing boat off of Peru's northern port of Chimbote, in 2012. Peru is the world's top fishmeal exporter, producing about a third of worldwide supply. Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Maman Pye cacao, a Haitian supertree, can produce 20 times as many cacao pods as ordinary trees, and the pods themselves are denser with cacao seeds than ordinary pods. Shutterstock hide caption

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The BACTrack Vio keychain breathalyzer and app on the iPhone at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C. A public health researcher says tools like this could help people make better decisions about alcohol use. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Spain's Alberto Contador eats a banana in as he rides in the pack during the sixth stage of the Tour de France on July 10, 2014. The cyclists aim to eat up to 350 calories an hour as they ride, and up to 9,000 calories a day. Laurent Cipriani/AP hide caption

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General Mills' original Cheerios are now GMO-free. But you won't find a label on the box highlighting the change. David Duprey/AP hide caption

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Mixed martial arts fighter Cornell Ward (from left), chef Daniel Strong, triathlete Dominic Thompson, lifestyle blogger Joshua Katcher and competitive bodybuilder Giacomo Marchese at a vegan barbecue in Brooklyn, N.Y. Courtesy of James Koroni hide caption

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Soylent CEO Rob Rhinehart holds a bag of finished product in September 2013. Rhinehart recently discouraged members of the company's DIY online community from competing directly with Soylent. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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This young male, buried at a prehistoric site in Central Sudan, probably munched on the roots of a plant called purple nutsedge. Donatella Usai/Centro Studi Sudanesi and Sub-Sahariani hide caption

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A glass of the seaweed beer created by Marshall Wharf Brewing Co. in Belfast, Maine. Jay Field/MPBN hide caption

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A single snail from an air cargo shipment of 67 live snails that arrived at Los Angeles International Airport on July 1. Officials said that the 35 pounds of snails arrived from Nigeria along with paperwork stating they were for human consumption. Greg Bartman/AP hide caption

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A nutrient-dense diet may help tamp down stress. And these foods may help boost our moods (clockwise from left): pumpkin seeds, sardines, eggs, salmon, flax seeds, Swiss chard and dark chocolate. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Organic fruits and vegetables deliver between 20 and 40 percent more antioxidants than conventional fruits and vegetables, a new study finds. Molly Marshall/Flickr hide caption

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