Yao honey hunter Orlando Yassene holds a male greater honeyguide temporarily captured for research in the Niassa National Reserve, Mozambique. The birds will flutter in front of people, tweet and fly from tree to tree to guide hunters to bees' nests that are hidden inside the trunks of hollow trees. This teamwork could date back thousands or even a million years. Claire Spottiswoode hide caption

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How Wild Birds Team Up With Humans To Guide Them To Honey

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Grains, beads and bangles unearthed from dig sites in Banda, Ghana, tell of a time when droughts did not bring famine. (Above) Archaeologists Amanda Logan and Osei Kofi dig into the floor of a house from the 1500s. Courtesy of Ann Stahl/Northwestern University hide caption

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Starting this week, Wal-Mart, America's largest grocer, says it will start piloting sales of weather-dented apples at a discount in 300 of its Florida stores. Courtesy of Wal-Mart hide caption

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Lebanese chefs celebrate in Beirut after setting a new Guinness record for what was then the biggest tub of hummus in the world — weighing over 2 tons — in October 2009. The world record effort was part of Lebanon's bid to claim hummus as its own. Ramzi Haidar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Give Chickpeas A Chance: Why Hummus Unites, And Divides, The Mideast

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Workers sort potatoes in the field, collecting small and large ones in different buckets. Each bucket weighs 30 pounds or so. A worker will shoulder that bucket and dump it into a flatbed truck hundreds of times each day. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Rich Harlan prepares Coney hot dogs at his restaurant, Red Hots Coney Island, in Detroit. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Coney: The Hot Dog That Fueled Detroit's Middle-Class Dreams

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Daal — yellow, red, brown or black — is a staple across India. It is often described, inadequately, I think, as lentil soup. Except it's so much more. Arash James Iravan/Getty Images hide caption

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Dishes with Oysters, Fruit, and Wine, c. 1620/1625, oil on panel, Patrons' Permanent Fund Osias Beert the Elder/Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art hide caption

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An illustration shows spikes of different types of wheat: (1) Polish wheat (2) Club wheat (3) Common bread wheat (4) Poulard wheat (5) Durum wheat (6) Spelt (7) Emmer (8) Einkorn. The Library of Congress/Flickr The Commons hide caption

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