Working Late: Older Americans On The Job Increasingly, people are continuing to work past the age of 65. Government statistics show that almost a third of Americans between 65 and 70 are working. Some can't afford to retire. But many are still working because they can. In a series, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

The recession put a dent in Sims-Wood's savings, and she expects she'll have to stay in the workforce "forever." Gabriella Demczuk/NPR hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/NPR

When A Bad Economy Means Working 'Forever'

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Working Late: In Tough Economy, Retirement Gets Pushed Back

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John David, 73, teaches an exercise class called PACE to seniors at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. The former TV producer says he has finally found his true calling. Shiho Fukada for NPR hide caption

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Shiho Fukada for NPR

For One Senior, Working Past Retirement Age Is A Workout

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