The Legacy And Future Of Mass Incarceration Between 1970 and 2010 more people were incarcerated in the U.S. than were imprisoned in any other country, and at no other point in its past had the nation's economic, social and political institutions become so bound up with the practice of punishment. This year, NPR will report on the Rockefeller Drug Laws and their consequences.

Now 59, George Prendes works as a telemarketer in New York and struggles to make the rent on his small Bronx apartment. Natasha Haverty hide caption

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Natasha Haverty

Decades On, Stiff Drug Sentence Leaves A Life 'Dismantled'

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The Drug Laws That Changed How We Punish

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